Lawn damage, found bug shells?

HighChiefKC

LawnSite Member
Have a client that has wide spread dead spots in lawn. Fungus is rampant in our area. Client, like most, assume it’s grubs. Client has merit put on every June. While inspecting lawn and digging up spots, I found what looked like a red shell of an insect or something. Only found one out of the several spots I dug up
Homeowner emails me this morning and while mowing she had another show up in a spot.
Ive been on google and Purdue’s website all
morning and I can’t find anything that resembles what’s in the picture.
Here’s pic of said red shell, and the damage to lawn
Any help appreciated
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KerbDMK

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Difficult to tell from the photos but it looks like the damage is concentrated in low areas? If so, it may be pythium blight fungus.

That used to be a grub, but if you've only found two, I don't think they could have done that much damage.
 
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HighChiefKC

LawnSite Member
Customer said it was alive and well, and it was moving. But had no legs. Like larvae or something. Told her to do dish soap test to see if more come out of ground.
 

hort101

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
S.E. New England
Customer said it was alive and well, and it was moving. But had no legs. Like larvae or something. Told her to do dish soap test to see if more come out of ground.
Yes they wiggle its in process of changing from a grub to an adult
Grub damage can be going on at same time as drought or fungus

Its often more then 1 cause

Also the grubs eat the roots the grass browning might not show up until heat or lack of water stresses the grass
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
I agree with Hort 101. Probably a pupa which is about to turn into an adult and fly away. Japanese beetle maybe.
One beetle is not significant.
Grubs at the level of 10 per square foot, can cause major damage and need treatment. They munch away on the roots until most roots are gone. Difficult to kill when they are mature and large, but easy to kill when they first hatch--about late June--preventative treatment.
To me the area looks like perennial rye, and perhaps it thinned out from a dry spell a few months ago. Rye does not creep--so rake out thatch and overseed. Use a modern disease resistant rye.
Correct sprinkler faults if any. Was there a leak or broken head in the past? Area on the upper left in the photo looks fine.
Grass looks fine near the roses.
 
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HighChiefKC

LawnSite Member
I agree with Hort 101. Probably a pupa which is about to turn into an adult and fly away. Japanese beetle maybe.
One beetle is not significant.
Grubs at the level of 10 per square foot, can cause major damage and need treatment. They munch away on the roots until most roots are gone. Difficult to kill when they are mature and large, but easy to kill when they first hatch--about late June--preventative treatment.
To me the area looks like perennial rye, and perhaps it thinned out from a dry spell a few months ago. Rye does not creep--so rake out thatch and overseed. Use a modern disease resistant rye.
Correct sprinkler faults if any. Was there a leak or broken head in the past? Area on the upper left in the photo looks fine.
Grass looks fine near the roses.
No irrigation at all
 
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HighChiefKC

LawnSite Member
Army worm. Get em quick

Wow, after google searching army worm, I’ve found ton of pics that match my pics! I’ve never seen this in a lawn before. Honestly the only issues I’ve ever had, had been grubs. Thanks for the help!
I didn’t see any actual worms while on the lawn, will look into it more!
 
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