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Ok, forget the whole 20 - 25 bucks a cut thing for a moment. I'm about to place some bids on commercial accounts. What numbers do ya'll use to base your bids on. The accounts are in the Dallas, Texas area. St. Augustine and Bermuda are the grass types, sometimes I'll run into Fescue, but that's very unlikely.

Mowing per/sq ft...
trimming linear feet,
edging...

I havent big on commercial accounts before, and I want to underbid some companies but I don't want to be doing these jobs for pocket change. Help is much appreciated:) Thanks guys.
 

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Lets all get together and charge double what we normaly would so we can make soom real change. Since we are in the same area and if we talked every one we know in to it we could ALL make out like bandits. But to not answer your question I can't help I have only done small 30 min. commercial jobs and residentials.
 

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Bid it for what you NEED to get to do the job and be profitable. Any less than that and you're better off not doing it. Dont worry about what "the other guy" gets. He doesen't have YOUR equipment, costs, etc.... only YOU know what those costs are.
No sense in taking a job (esp. on a contract) and losing money on it, just to outbid the next guy!
 

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Thats what I'm talking about I won't try to out bid someone and not make as much as I could. I would rather spend that extra time with the family and drinking beer. So when I do occasionaly have to bid against another LCO I usually do not to get the job unless they call me after a few weeks when they are not getting what they expected. It would be real tough to get all the LCO's to go with it even though I know most of them a few would try to capitalize on it.
 

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jwing-good luck on the bid, I bid my jobs for what I can be happy with and what th customer can afford. If you are not happy with the price, you will not do a good job. If the customer is not happy with the bid, you will lose the job. I bid my jobs by how long it will take at $30.00 per hour and hope to get no less than $25.00 if I bid it too low. Anything under $25 is rebid or lost: I have to be happy with the bid or I will not be doing a good job, hence it is re-bid.
Good luck, hope you get it at your price (but not to low)!!
 

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Originally posted by TRex
Lets all get together and charge double what we normaly would so we can make soom real change. Since we are in the same area and if we talked every one we know in to it we could ALL make out like bandits. But to not answer your question I can't help I have only done small 30 min. commercial jobs and residentials.
That all sounds great but that is also called "collusion" and is highly illegal. Just ask General Electric. They have been burnt many times. Sorry to be such a downer because I love the idea.

col·lu·sion ( P ) Pronunciation Key (k-lzhn)
n.
A secret agreement between two or more parties for a fraudulent, illegal, or deceitful purpose.
 

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Originally posted by jwingfield2k

I havent big on commercial accounts before, and I want to underbid some companies but I don't want to be doing these jobs for pocket change.
Excellent approach, then next year the other guy can do the same to you and in a few more years all you guys can go belly-up!
 

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Try your best to estimate the man hours involved and the equipment needed. Go from there never round down to get a job try to sell yourself and hope for the best. If you can maybe try to compare to other jobs you have done as far as time goes and travel distance.
 

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How many production days can you work per season there?
How many hours can you work per day?
If you have 8 months of mowing season, 8*4wks is 32 production weeks, if you can work (Solo) 24 hours per week, thats about 6 hours on the actual jobsite 4 days per week (allow for bad weather and problems)
then, 32*24 = 768 production hours per season.
How much do YOU want to make?
Lets say $50,000 per year...
50,000 / 768 = $65.10 per hour to recover Gross Labor;
That plus Equip./Overhead , maybe $10.00 per hour = $75.00 per billable production hour. ;)
How many hours will it take you to do it?
Lets say 4 - 6 hours depending on conditions (wetness, etc) avg of 5 hours .... So, 5 * $75.00 = 375 * number of cuts 32 = $12,000.00 per year Billed @ $1,000.00 per month year 'round.

Best thing to do is start bidding a few high, and gradually figure out where you need to be. If you go low and try to go up, you'll work yourself to death...get sick of the account, and either give it up or lose it, and the compettion will come back in at their prices and get it back....might even make more money, and say see.."you get what you pay for!"

;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No, not really, but the answers did give me insight to a final solution, but if anyone does have rates that would be great. Just something that I can base my numbers off of. Thanks.
 

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Word Willis j what would you do if I tried to under bid you then we would both lose if I got the job I would not make any thing for the work involved and you would not make anything at all. Just think about it is not always about getting the job if you don't make what you could. Just tying to put it in perspective for you.
 

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Well I try to get about 5-6 per thousand on residental,and on commercial 7.50 up depens on the amount of small areas. Always rember you can always go broke sitting at home why go work and go broke, so always make sure you are making money. I hope that helps.
 

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Is there any other services included in the bid? Are there any hedges to be trimmed, fert. and weed control aps, mulch, planting, etc.? If you're just going to mow, trim and blow then you need to take into consideration your equipment, upkeep, and labor. Look at the propertys size and how long it will take you to complete. From there it is quite simple. Time X $$ expectaions/hr X cuts per year. Around here you can average 32 cuts/yr, but not sure how many you average in Texas.
 

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Originally posted by hubby-wife
jwing-good luck on the bid, I bid my jobs for what I can be happy with and what th customer can afford. If you are not happy with the price, you will not do a good job. If the customer is not happy with the bid, you will lose the job. I bid my jobs by how long it will take at $30.00 per hour and hope to get no less than $25.00 if I bid it too low. Anything under $25 is rebid or lost: I have to be happy with the bid or I will not be doing a good job, hence it is re-bid.
Good luck, hope you get it at your price (but not to low)!!
DUDE!!! What the heck are you talking about 25-30 an hour?!!! That is ridiculously low. Please do us all a favor and increase your rates by 50%, I promise you will be a lot happier and so will the rest of us. I'm really not trying to bash you or anything but you are way too cheap. THATS SCRUB RATES. We all need to be on the same page with our pricing. I am assuming that you mow, edge, weed eat, and blow for every account, right? If not maybe I am off base. I can tell you that my minimum is 30 dollars for any yard, and thats for the new homes that are less than a quarter acre, and up. With two people we can do 2.75 an hour so you do the math!
 

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Whatdefunk is so right! Lowball bids like that do nothing more than hurt our industry. I understand that you may need the work, but not at all of our expense. If you plan on staying in this industry you'll see how much damage you or others can cause by bidding so low. Take into consideration that over the last 10 years the average yard has only gone up about $5. That's not even close to keeping up with the rising cost of our economy. LCO's are actually taking home less than they were 10 years ago since the value of the dollar has gone down so much. Just something to think about before you start bidding at that low of a rate.
 

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Going rate where I live is $30-$35 and hour hour just for mowing, so he isnt that far off. But 30-35 is also min. for a lawn so having the small properties are the money maker in my mind. When I first started I had no idea what to charge so I called the biggest company in my area told him I had just under a half acre and what he would charge without coming to look at it, He said about $25.00!!:dizzy: Whats funny is Ive taken 6 residential accounts from them because of poor quality work. Just charge what you need to pay expenses and make your desired profit.
 
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