LCOs what additional services do you offer?

ultimateanswer

LawnSite Member
Location
Norman, OK
I have finished my first independent season here and now I am looking forward towards next season and what additional, if any services, other spray companies are offering. This last season I offered in addition to the usual lawn squirt-n-fert I also offered surface insect control with Bifen, grub control with merrit/dylox/arena, aerations (did a total of two not including my own yard) and overseeding (offered but didn't perform). I had roughly 50% customer penetration on surface IC, 20-25% on grubs, 2 aerations as stated above and no seeding last year. I had thought about buying the equipment needed to do mosquito treatments as that would be covered under my current 3a cert here, but was wondering what everyone else offered.
For reference I operate a single truck op with roughly 200 customers.
 

andersman02

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Snowy MN
Offer mosquito, very easy to outfit and cheap material. Even using stuff other then bifen it's still inexpensive and works.

Some type of soil building, liquid aeration if you can find a solid product or granular product

Grub preventative using acelepryn. Grubs are best prevented, not post. If something has had grubs, push them to do the preventative each season. Double the app price.

Push aeration/seeds hard, they often create the biggest impact on a lawn.

Everything you leave for the customer sold have some type of upsell. Do an email blast offering 5% off plug seeds a couple weeks before the seeding season (after you raise the list price 5% of course).

Lastly, make things auto reoccurring if you can. We make everything except plug seeding auto renewing. Yes we get some people not wanting something but they are few
 

cool breeze

LawnSite Senior Member
Mosquito and deer repellant applications are very popular add-ons in my area. Also lime applications based on a soil test from a reputable lab.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
I also think, seeding is a good idea. New dark green, extra dense, spreading type rhizomatous fescue. Heat and disease resistant. Let the seed company brochure help you with the advertising and sales promotion.
Be sure to mention recommendations from OSU. Such as the new "Ironcutter".
Sod--even better.

Be ready with Bermuda seed when that suits the customer's needs.
Aeration is good for preparation. You can also do a short mowing and blow-off of residue as seed-sowing preparation.

Also be ready to have a special sale on ryegrass winter overseeding on Bermuda for winter color.
When I was in Oklahoma City (Bricktown) last year--the Bermuda was very brown.
Be sure you are able to diagnose lawn disease--and have fungicide on hand whenever you spot disease.
And be sure to have winter salt on hand. Ice storms happen--am I right? Stores and banks hate it when customers slip and fall.
 

phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
Offer mosquito, very easy to outfit and cheap material. Even using stuff other then bifen it's still inexpensive and works.

Some type of soil building, liquid aeration if you can find a solid product or granular product

Grub preventative using acelepryn. Grubs are best prevented, not post. If something has had grubs, push them to do the preventative each season. Double the app price.

Push aeration/seeds hard, they often create the biggest impact on a lawn.

Everything you leave for the customer sold have some type of upsell. Do an email blast offering 5% off plug seeds a couple weeks before the seeding season (after you raise the list price 5% of course).

Lastly, make things auto reoccurring if you can. We make everything except plug seeding auto renewing. Yes we get some people not wanting something but they are few
All good ideas. Just be aware that mosquito control requires an additional pesticide license.
 
OP
U

ultimateanswer

LawnSite Member
Location
Norman, OK
Rye is a pita in my market. People love it all winter long. So much so that they don't want you to smoke it off in the spring and then complain when their yard goes brown when everyone else's is greener than all get-out! I've done more than my fair share of those at previous companies I've been with.

All good ideas. Just be aware that mosquito control requires an additional pesticide license.
I've done a little research on this actually. In OK, under the 3a certified applicator license any pesticide applied to turf, landscape or ornamentals is covered. Because application would be to foliar surfaces and further than 36" from the foundation base of the home it does not fall under the class 2, 3b, 3c, 7 and 8 requirements.

Honestly, I was looking to see if anyone was offering anything other than what I currently offer, or what I've already dropped the capital on to be able to do next season(fogger for skeeters).
Definitely going to be pushing overseeds and aerations next season. They're time consuming, but great profit centers for me.
...
Be sure you are able to diagnose lawn disease--and have fungicide on hand whenever you spot disease.
And be sure to have winter salt on hand. Ice storms happen--am I right? Stores and banks hate it when customers slip and fall.
It's funny you mention lawn disease and having fungicide on hand! I ran into this a few years ago with a yard I had with a previous employer. After diagnosing the issue, I didn't have what I needed on the truck! So I popped over to the local co-op and put together what I like to call my triage kit. Always keep it with me on route and it has saved my bacon more times than I can count!
Also, I approached the franchise I used to work for about doing de-icing during winter. He brushed me off on it saying something about it being damaging to the equipment and not all that profitable. Any insight on this? What all would I need to get started? I'm done spraying for the year and honestly, I'm bored as hell sitting at home reading and whatnot. Any special equipment necessary? Care and upkeep suggestions for repurposing my existing equipment (push spreader, slide-in 300gal, backpacks/hand cans/etc)? Also keep in mind that I am squirt and fert only, I don't mow or maintain.
Keep the suggestions coming!
 

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phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
I've done a little research on this actually. In OK, under the 3a certified applicator license any pesticide applied to turf, landscape or ornamentals is covered. Because application would be to foliar surfaces and further than 36" from the foundation base of the home it does not fall under the class 2, 3b, 3c, 7 and 8 requirements.
Yup, it looks like you're good in Oklahoma for mosquito treatments that aren't applied to bodies of water.
 
OP
U

ultimateanswer

LawnSite Member
Location
Norman, OK
Yup, it looks like you're good in Oklahoma for mosquito treatments that aren't applied to bodies of water.
If you'll take note, fellow Okies especially, the class 5 cert for aquatic specifically exempts mosquito treatments as a public health service. So no additional certs are required beyond your 3a residential.
 

hort101

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
S.E. New England
Also, I approached the franchise I used to work for about doing de-icing during winter. He brushed me off on it saying something about it being damaging to the equipment and not all that profitable. Any insight on this? What all would I need to get started? I'm done spraying for the year and honestly, I'm bored as hell sitting at home reading and whatnot. Any special equipment necessary? Care and upkeep suggestions for repurposing my existing equipment (push spreader, slide-in 300gal, backpacks/hand cans/etc)? Also keep in mind that I am squirt and fert only, I don't mow or maintain.
Keep the suggestions coming!
You might want to check out plowsite for reading and join for information on liquid deicing

I doubt you would use all the same equipment but dont let that stop you if you are interested and a there's market for it in you area
 
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