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LEAVES??

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by SJR Lawncare, Jul 21, 2000.

  1. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 13,490

    I'm with you on that one Parrot! I do the same steps but when we cut, we run open chutes. This does two things. First. it shuffles all the leaves to the surface to dry without clumping any grass. Second it reduces the material considerably. We then use Little Wonder push blowers and Lazers to wind row and pile the leaves, (Still leaving nice mowing rows) We then use mulching plates to turn the material to dust- usually disappearing altogether or atleast reducing it to VERY small piles. This we just tarp and throw on the truck (just a 1 ton dump) No plywood sides required- I can pick up leaves ALL DAY and never have to dump the truck- It's just dust! And we get aALOT of leaves here in central Michigan! Customers don't mind, and there is never any signs of where the piles were because we hit those spots with backpacks after if necessary. That's just 17 years of experience I guess!
     
  2. MOW ED

    MOW ED LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,028

    I have been doing leaves for 5 years here in Green Bay and I have been using a Walker with great results. When the leaves are dry I can turn them to powder and if they are wet I have to go slower but it still works. <br>Pricing is pretty good here too. Most jobs are dumped on the curb and the city picks them up for free. The ones I remove are put in the pickup bed and front of the trailer on tarps and they are pretty easy to unload.
     
  3. Marquis Lawn

    Marquis Lawn LawnSite Member
    Messages: 21

    Anyone ever use one of those JRCO leaf plows? It looks like a bulldozer attachment on the front of your WB. From the looks of it, you could just blow out the beds, and push all the leaves to the curb to the loader. Sounds real easy to me, anyone ever tried it yet? I'm gonna buy one, but I'd like to hear from one of you guinea pigs who bought one already. :)
     
  4. AGG Lawn Maintenance

    AGG Lawn Maintenance LawnSite Senior Member
    from Elberon
    Messages: 422

    We put all leaves curbside for city pick up.<br>Any leaves we remove we charge $50.00 per pick up load to dump. We either bag or blow off lawns in Oct-November. In December we do Final Fall Clean ups removing leaves from the lawns and beds. Fall clean ups are done weekly removing leave from just the lawn areas. I think its best if you put any leaves curb side for city pick up. For the Fall Clean up we charge the same as a cut. Because the grass has slowed down by this point we just blow and maybe cut no edging and trimming. Final Fall Clean ups we charge 4 times a cut. We remove leaves from the lawn and bed areas. We have our timing down to a tee. (two ground blowers two back packs, mower baggers and vac's) Travis AG&G Lawn Maintenance
     
  5. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 13,490

    Mr. Marquise, While I haven't seen the leaf plow in action, I do have a JRCO tine dethatcher. I keep this on a Gravely 300 rider that I use. I am able to use this to push piles of leaf mulch onto the tarps with it. With the hydraulic lift on the mower, I plow it upward on the tarp and then just &quot;shake&quot; the deck a little and the remainder just drops on to the tarp. I believe that the leaf &quot;plow&quot; really isn't going to clean all the leaves and may even tear up some turf. The tine dethatcher rake works great though, not so much for dethatching but for doing those cleanups that the leaves, sticks and such are matted down in the grass.(especially spring). Good luck with it.<br><p><font size="1">Edited by: Runner
     
  6. jeffyr

    jeffyr LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 876

    I've seen a couple of guys using the leaf plow on a WB and a Walker. It is useful to move piles once you get them to a street or driveway. none of them used it on the turf. If that is all it does, I'm sure any of us could fabricate some kind of plow a whole lot cheaper. And from the looks, a whole lot lighter too.
     
  7. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Messages: 1,687

    Perhaps some eduction on different types os leaves is needed. While talking with ELM he does the same mulching procedure, and was surprised that we bag, tarp, leaf load and the like.<br>Well it seems east coast leaves are much more abundant, and red oak leaves for one wont fall to at least Dec 1 and when they do, they are very acidic, and not good to mulch into the turf. So most everyone hauls them away. Most towns around us dont pick up at the curb, although towards the larger cities they do. <br>I remember all the leaf cleanup BS and am gald that I sub it all out now. We still clean the beds and make piles, we just hire someone to load them up.<br>Dino<p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     
  8. thelawnguy

    thelawnguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,411

    Im practically neighbors with plowking35, and can attest to the fact that the northeast is one big forest with small clearings with houses in them. The vast quantity of leaves mandates picking them up, though when they first start to fall, and at the end, you can get away with mulching (as I do, reducing the amount left to tarp away by half or less). But when the bulk come down in November, youre talking about 3 inches of leaf cover that no mower can mulch effectively without suffocating the lawn..<p>Two communities I work in have curbside pickup so I just drag a tarp full to the curb, the third city doesnt pick up unless they are bagged in paper sacks so for the handful of customers that require removal I just tarp them into the back of the truck (with 4 foot sideboards). I contemplated a leaf loader and box but decided that it wouldnt be cost effective given the quantity (maybe seven truck loads per fall) I remove per season. And there is no charge to dispose of leaves so that helps.<p>If you are buying a leaf loader spend the extra money for an 11 hp or greater, other contractors have indicated that the 8hp vs 11/16+ hp ones price vs aggravation isnt worth the smaller one.<p>Bill
     
  9. Guido

    Guido LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,087

    Thanks Bill and Dino, I knew I wasn't dreaming about all those fall time images in CT when I wrote my post!! I have a hard time believing all those leaves can be mulched come near Halloween timeframe. Bill's definetly right about the loader. I had an 8 and then a 14. A buddy of mine had an 11HP. the 11 and 14 were unreal compared to the little 8!! And the 8 clogged 3 times as much as the others did.<p><p>----------<br>&lt;a href=&quot;http://communities.msn.com/guidosequipmentpics/&quot;&gt;&quot;Guido&quot;&lt;/a&gt;<br>David M. Famiglietti
     
  10. DaveOhio

    DaveOhio LawnSite Member
    Messages: 31

    We have a great system for leaf removal. We usually begin at the foundation of the house and blow out the beds. (backpack) Then we begin blowing into piles. Usually you must work with the wind here. Once we've got a bulk of leaves, our Great Dane Surfer blows through with its leaf plow and pushes a big bite toward our truck. We have an old Ford F-600 stake dump. We made an add on leaf body with a screened roof. We tow a 60 hp leaf vac that SUCKS. Definatley overkill, it runs most days on idle. It shreds and greatly reduces the volume of leaves we haul. It is easy to find places to legally dump these leaves. In Ohio, this is the best way to handle bulk leaves. We used a tarp three times last fall.
     

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