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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Received my soil test results and planned on aerating and overseeding this weekend. The test results indicated a pH of 5.8. A little on the acidic side. I am planning on applying some lime and was wondering if I should wait to seed, wait to lime or if it matters at all whether or not I seed shortly after applying lime. I was under the impression that it really doesn't matter, but wanted to get some confirmation here. Thanks.
 

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like you have heard, it doesnt matter. I did a lawn renovation and was told to put down lime also. good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Originally posted by greenman
That's really not bad at all. Not really. Normal around these parts are 5.3 to 5.8.
True. Not all that bad, but not ideal either. I'd like to get it into the mid 6's. Put down approx. 40 lbs/1000 of granular dolimitic limestone this past weekend. Will put down another 20 per in the spring and have the soil tested again next fall. Any other thoughts? Anything you'd do differently?
 

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Steer clear of sulfur coated fertilizers in the future.
 

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Yes, if used over time, the sulfur coating on SCU's will lower the soil Ph. If you're in an area that has a low soil Ph, you might want to switch to a poly coated fertilizer. I was involved in a study of this in my college soils class years ago. Since this is common knowledge amongst golf course superintendents, I'm sure other universities have also studied this effect.
 

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I'm fairly new around here, but I think I can help on this one because I have the opposite problem with a lawn ph of about 7.8. At least some of the Lesco Poly-Plus products are made with sulfur-coated urea. Sulfur is one of the few products that can lower ph, so I have been looking for feritlizer products with more sulfur. Sounds like you may want to avoid at least that product, or at least find fertilizers that have lower sulfur content.

Hope this helps -- here's a link to Lesco's website: www.lesco.com.
 
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