Liquid Iron in late fall

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by Methodical2, Nov 14, 2018.

  1. KerbDMK

    KerbDMK LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,289

    @That Guy Gary I'm not trying to boost my post count here, but I have just brushed up on my reading, and now I'm beginning to think that sulfur, even though initially more expensive, is easier to apply and can last for up to 5 years. Sulfer wins. Thanks for inspiring me to reevaluate. :)
     
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  2. That Guy Gary

    That Guy Gary LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,139

    No problem!

    That sulfur you linked was way overpriced.

    We use nutrasul 90, I see that online for $25/50 lb bag, we pay a lot less but buy by the pallet.

    You should be able to find it locally in that price range. 90% elemental sulfur, 10% clay binder.

    I'd recommend a soil test too so you know where you are at. If your soil has enough lime it'll take more sulfur to see an effect on the pH than the guidelines on the bag say.

    You can put more down at the end of the season when grass is dormant than you can during the growing season. I treat a few properties with 10 lbs/1k at the end of every year with no damage.
     
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  3. KerbDMK

    KerbDMK LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,289

    Yeah, I found sulfur for less after I made that post. Thanks for the tip on NutraSul that will save me even more dough!

    My soil test says 7.0 with no recommendation for sulfur.

    From what I read today, elemental sulfur is broken down by biological activity, so fall applications are not advised. Maybe it just sits there until spring? Anyway, I don't expect to see my grass again until March :laugh:, :wall .

    Wow 10lb/K, that's a lot. You must have free calcium in your soils.

    https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/agf-507
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2018
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  4. KerbDMK

    KerbDMK LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,289

    That's interesting I see that the NutraSul label says there is some benefit to broadcasting that particular product in the fall.
     
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  5. That Guy Gary

    That Guy Gary LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,139

    All our irrigation water is real hard, lots of lime. Most of the sulfur will remain in the lawn over winter and it has time to dissipate.

    It'll start oxidizing as soon as microbial activity gets going too, instead of a delay if we did it in spring.

    It's safer for the turf, especially at high rates. We go 10 lbs per on a few properties with massive maples to help prevent iron chlorosis. I would never apply that much to active turf, it would probably burn.
     
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  6. Methodical2

    Methodical2 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 134

    THIS is what I use. It costs me $10.40 per application (8k sq').

    $104/5 gallon or $20.80/gallon. At 8 oz/1k sq' (@ 8k sq'), I get 2 applications per gallon or $10.40 per application or $1.30/1k sq'.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2018
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  7. KerbDMK

    KerbDMK LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,289


    That certainly seems to be a good value, if it works well, and is convenient for you to apply, then I think you found a good solution for your situation.

    I apologize for not being able to contribute to your original question and for sidetracking your thread a little here, but I’m grateful that you started this because I think it will be a big help to me.

    Have you had your soil tested? A pH of 7.0 or greater significantly reduces the grass’s ability to get all the micronutrients that it needs. If I can get my pH down closer to 6.0 it will be like giving the lawn a complete micronutrient package.
     
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  8. Methodical2

    Methodical2 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 134

    KerbDMK, I am glad everyone is chiming in to make this an informational thread, so no need to apologize.

    Yes, I had my soil tested in fall 2017 and ph was 6.4 in the front and 6.5 in the rear. I am going to send off my dirt this week to see where it's at now and I plan to do it again in 2018 - trying see if there's a trend or systemic issues etc.

    John Perry has a video that I think you may like. He talks about his soil test and how getting PH right would unlock things.

     
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  9. KerbDMK

    KerbDMK LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,289

    @Methodical2 Thanks for the video.

    I don’t think anybody has done anything to try to improve my soil in over 40 years, I’ve been here for thirty and for nearly all those years I have only used the bare minimum of fertilizer on it. Not that it needed any more, it was intended to be a low input lawn, but it had gotten old and tired. I’ve had a lot of fun experimenting with different cultivars of grass seed for the past 7 or 8 years now and began what may be my final renovation process (in sections) into a higher input lawn last year.

    Your pH is perfect and is what I would be trying to achieve. I only have a half point to go, so I do need to be careful not to go too far. My calcium count is a little below medium so I don’t think that I have very much buffer built into my soil either.

    I’m glad to discover that an adjustment of pH with sulfur is both practical and affordable, so I’ll give it a try!
     
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  10. envirocleanhouston

    envirocleanhouston LawnSite Member
    Messages: 48

    Defiantly not true that you can't mix Iron and Nitrogen. The oldest trick in the books growing up turning grass dark green was Ammonium Sulfate / Ferrous Sulfate. I switched to a EDDHA product similar to what was pictured above, except I believe my micronutrient package is Feature 6-0-0
     

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