manhattan euonymus..remove or prune?

jranaudo

LawnSite Member
Customer has these massive manhattan euonymus shrubs and wants them either removed or trimmed significantly. Specifically the width to take off 2-3 feet. If I do this it would leave them pretty much bare and looking like crap.

These shrubs have some serious girth to their branches in there. I am thinking it may be easier to just remove them. Any thoughts?

Any Auggestions would help.

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knox gsl

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
knoxville, tn
Cut off with a chainsaw and leave about 10 inches sticking out the ground. It will look bad for a while but then they will shoot out new growth and you can trim to size desired ovet time.

This is the second best thing to do, the best is to trim a little closer to the ground and finish them off with a stump grinder.
 

ilike2mow

LawnSite Bronze Member
Cut off with a chainsaw and leave about 10 inches sticking out the ground. It will look bad for a while but then they will shoot out new growth and you can trim to size desired ovet time.

This is the second best thing to do, the best is to trim a little closer to the ground and finish them off with a stump grinder.


That's if you want to completely remove the plants. If your wanting to cut them back but still keep them I would cut them back with a chainsaw.
 
OP
J

jranaudo

LawnSite Member
ok makes sense. I will just have to make the customer aware it will not look pretty for some time until the regrowth occurs. The shrubs do grow pretty darn quick to I lean towards a major prune of height and width and let them grow in. The customer likes the privacy they provide so I think this is better than removing completely.
 

ilike2mow

LawnSite Bronze Member
Once you cut them back you can take your hedge trimmer and cut them to whatever shape you wish.

Just make sure for the job you price accordingly depending on how you will haul off the debris from cutting the bushes. You may want to offer to the customer you can run everything through a rented wood chipper and spread the mulch from the bushes in the area of where the bushes were growing.
 

xstatikplus

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
toronto ontario
Privacy is a big bonus. If you got it you want to keep it. Serious pruning then maintaining would be in the best interest if your customer likes the privacy. When I do a job like that I always make the customer aware it will not look good for some time also I don't guaranty a plant will survive if they want a severe pruning on some types of shrubs. Saves you possible hassle if the trimming kills the plant.
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OP
J

jranaudo

LawnSite Member
Privacy is a big bonus. If you got it you want to keep it. Serious pruning then maintaining would be in the best interest if your customer likes the privacy. When I do a job like that I always make the customer aware it will not look good for some time also I don't guaranty a plant will survive if they want a severe pruning on some types of shrubs. Saves you possible hassle if the trimming kills the plant.
Posted via Mobile Device

ah yes this is a good point. I will be writing up the proposal tonight. I think it's the best option as re-planting something in their place would be more costly and likely take even more time to offer the privacy they currently have.
 
OP
J

jranaudo

LawnSite Member
Those things are beauts! Talk about privacy!! And thank God, no scale infestation!!!

yes great for privacy but the homeowner complained that they have become so large they are taking up part of his yard. You can't see it but these things are like 8-10 deep!!!

I also thought of maybe cutting them back a good bit then putting in a fence so they won't continue to grow into the yard.
 

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