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Pricing a lawn in a million dollar neighborhood for weekly maintenance. (Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing, weed control in beds) Property will take about 1hr15minutes...1hr30minutes.
They are currently unsatisfied w/ the landscaper caring for it now. Have price in my head...want to see what some of you think. What really like to get it...don't want to underbid just to get it or price myself out of it.
 

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Somewhere around $70.00 - $90.00 per service. Keeping the weeds down in spring/early summer will definately take longer. What about clippings?

There is always "site specific" things to consider (terrain, access, drive time, hedges, and the list goes on...).
 

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I live in one of those neighborhoods. Maybe I can offer some of my observations.

These people are image conscious. If you pull up in a 15 year old truck with no sign and dirty equipment, you still have a chance but they like to see their help driving nicer rigs. They don't have to be new, but don't ever leave an oil spill in the street with your old clunker. Uniforms are a nice addition to a corporate look on their lawns.

My next door neighbor was an investment banker. His house looked like a museum inside. His lawn service came every Wednesday for 4 years. They came with a crew of 3 at 8am, 52 weeks a year for 30 minutes to mow, edge, and blow a 40x40 plot of over watered St Augustine with 10x40 of flowers. Never mind that the grass didn't grow for about 30 of those weeks. These guys were the most regular thing since the full moon. I suspect they charged $30-$50. When it rained, which was seldom, they sent someone by to discuss it with the owner. They've moved now, and we never were very close after "the broken sprinkler incident" that took him 5 months to get around to fixing (I'm downhill from him), so I'm not likely to get more info about any of that.

My new neighbor across the street has a different situation. They're leasing for $36,000/year, so they're in a similar cash category as my former next door neighbor. These people are different, though because they seem to have personal relationships with their help. The lawn guy comes on Tuesdays and Fridays and stays all day from about 8am to about 5pm. He is alone, and they have about a full third of an acre with turf and trees on a corner lot with a wall (tons of edging). He does everything including all the plumbing and mechanical repairs in the garden, but when it looks like he might not have much to do, the lady sends him out to get plants to plant somewhere. Although the lawn guy doesn't speak much English, I'm sure they do much for him and his family at the Holidays. I suspect they pay this guy about $200 per week, but it could easily be twice that. I realize this seems low considering all the hours, but again, this is 52 week per year work and I think the guy is very lucky to have the gig. Besides, remember they are renting, so this isn't even their property they're paying for. They just want things to look VERY nice all the time.

Some of my neighbors will not balk at any rational price quote. They're more interested in professionalism with their service providers. These people make from $50,000 to $300,000 per month and will pay any minute fraction of that to others to help them out. They'll sit in the dark overnight waiting for a licensed electrician to come change a burned out light bulb (I'm not joking). The difference between you charging $60/hour or $100/hour is totally invisible to them as long as you do excellent work. Others, still, are extremely cash cautious. As someone else mentioned, they didn't get there by giving it away.

So my observations can be summarized as this: Do not be afraid to charge what you need to get; try to be extremely punctual; do what they want you to do; and if it rains; drop by personally to explain that you won't be doing the job today but will at the earliest convenience.
 

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Dchall, your so right.
Most of my cust live in 600k and up homes and they want professonal, prompt, and reliable service that even includes bringing the trash cans and newspaper up to the house. We are getting in the 80-100 an hour range on these props and one at $120 an hour...but your work has to be perfect...PERFECT PERFECT!!! They do nothing, we even clean the pool!

I would shoot for $100 a hour due to the level of detail work your getting into.
Good luck
 

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I don’t have any prejudices towards rich people. It doesn’t matter how they got their money, though hopefully it was legal AND honest. My only outlook on well-to-do neighborhoods is that they are more likely to afford my profitable prices. I always try to charge as much as the market will bear and the properties end up looking the same, no matter what side of town they’re on.
 

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That's an interesting post.

We usually bid for what we need, and what the work is worth.

Occassionally we will give a discount to a senior, or someone in a tight spot.

If someone lives in a 200,000 house, a design may cost them $800.

The only reason we would charge $2000 to design at a $700,000 home, is primarily due to the lot being 3 times larger, and the complication of tailoring the design around decks, ponds, putting greens and other luxuries that the wealthy can afford.

Due to the image factor, we would provide additional service in a luxury neighborhood for tree work. For example, sawdust chips are merely blown or raked from grass in most middle to upper-middle class neighborhoods. But in an elite neighborhood, we are willing to dedicate 1 to 2 hours for a worker to shop vac chips from a lawn. Something like that would be the main reason for a price increase.
 

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Originally posted by mdvaden

Due to the image factor, we would provide additional service in a luxury neighborhood for tree work. For example, sawdust chips are merely blown or raked from grass in most middle to upper-middle class neighborhoods. But in an elite neighborhood, we are willing to dedicate 1 to 2 hours for a worker to shop vac chips from a lawn. Something like that would be the main reason for a price increase.
:dizzy:

Just bid the work for what it's worth. Just because they have a lot of money doesn't mean that they should pay a higher wage than what you normally charge. I worked for a very wealthy couple a few years back who had a weekend home worth probably $15 - $20 million. When I first went there for the interview, their secretary told me that they have problems purchasing things a lot of the time because as soon as they tell a company where the order is going, the price goes up a lot. I know that they do not like it, and I know I would not like it either. Just charge the people whatever you think the job is worth. The same lawn, requiring the same services, in a different part of town would be the same price yes? Long story short, I think that Popsicle has it about right. I would say that $80 - $90 per cut would be fine. $100+ per cut if you think that it will require a lot of "other" work such as spending time with the clients each week discussing what is going on, or doing BS stuff around the place to help out such as moving things inside, bringing things outside, etc.
 

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I have customers that live in $1,000,000-$3,000,000 homes. I don't charge extra for the area, but give them a fair market value. People are always gunning for those accounts, and if I over price I loose. One thing to consider is those people are the ones who rub elbows with other well-to-do in our community. They can be quite benificial when trying to land other large accounts; including (better paying) commercial accounts since they're either CEO's or major stock-holders. Promote and SELL, SELL, SELL!
 

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75 - 90 minutes to complete...but how many people? Solo? You and one helper? Doing it yourself, I would say somewhere in the neighborhood of $95 - $125. For 2 people, then more.
 

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Don't price the job based on the value of the home. Wealthy people are not stupid and are well aware of lawn maintenace costs. I had an account one time that the home was worth well over 5 milllion dollars. It was a 1-1/2 acre lot with large flower and ornamental bed areas. At the time the going rate for a lawn that size was $45-$48. I serviced the account for $45 until the owner sold the property and moved. A week after they moved I received a nice letter from them for a job well done. In the envelope with the letter was a check for $500 ( a going away tip ). I also landed 3 other accounts from recommendations from them. Treat your customers with respect and reap the rewards.
 

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Originally posted by DennisF
Don't price the job based on the value of the home. Wealthy people are not stupid and are well aware of lawn maintenace costs. I had an account one time that the home was worth well over 5 milllion dollars. It was a 1-1/2 acre lot with large flower and ornamental bed areas. At the time the going rate for a lawn that size was $45-$48. I serviced the account for $45 until the owner sold the property and moved. A week after they moved I received a nice letter from them for a job well done. In the envelope with the letter was a check for $500 ( a going away tip ). I also landed 3 other accounts from recommendations from them. Treat your customers with respect and reap the rewards.
$45 for an acre and a half? I sure hope those bed areas were a helluva lot larger than the amount of lawn to cut. Nice going away tip BTW as well as the referrals.
 

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i had a terrible experience in the "million dollar" areas. the trend in this area is this: young couple buyes million dollar home, works nite and day to pay bills, u quote $50 a cut, they faint. i find most people who own very expensive homes are cheap, broke, or just think that u dont deserve to make a decent living. i do best with mid range homes(2-300,000). to answer your question, i would charge $75 a week
 

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i have had problems with the 700,000 stucco boxes that have been popping up all over some of the people are totally tapped out the mortgage the leased cars the vacation privet schools and guess who is the last to get paid the landscaper
 

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I'm seeing this "house poor" deal all the time now. Around here it's in the neighborhoods with $300,000-700,000 houses. I'm generalizing here but below $300,000 and they typically haven't overspent. Above $700,000 and they are truly well off. I had a new customer in a new $500,000 or so house with 2/3 acre of newly sodded Bermuda tell me that he has a sprinkler system but that he wasn't going to "break the bank" by watering it. It hasn't rained here in three weeks. Instead of watering the new, dry sod, his solution was to have me only cut it every other week until we get some rain. I told him that I wasn't crazy about that idea nor did I think that was an effective strategy and he dropped issue, but I won't be surprised if he calls and says "don't come this week."
 

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All of my customers are high end clients. I landed their accounts because the local lco's couldn't/wouldn't service their property the way that they wanted. I priced my work competitively, but the difference is that I did the work corrcectly and to their satisfaction. If a client wanted a bush trimmed or sheared in a way that I thought was not good for the plant, I would make a suggestion, offer to do it my way first, and if they didn't like it, I would do it their way. I earned their trust and they referred their millionaire friends to me. Many of these high end clients do their homework. They may play dumb to test who is going to take advantage of them. The point is, give these customers what they want - good service at fair prices and you can give up advertising for work because they will give you more work than you can handle.
 
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