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Must have attachments for mini

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by woodlawnservice, Feb 12, 2020.

  1. Ticolawnllc

    Ticolawnllc LawnSite Senior Member
    from Wall NJ
    Messages: 505

    Ok. So I think, first thing is first. The dirt buckets (the small tooth and a large smooth bucket) too start. From there the forks because they will be cheaper. That will give you time to make money. The grapple is next. From there maybe a skeleton bucket to help sift dirt to cut down on dirt dump fees and finally look into augers or power rakes. The cheaper attachments first. I would stay away from the “stump buckets”. They are cheap but they beat the machine up to much.
     
  2. OP
    OP
    woodlawnservice

    woodlawnservice LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,415

    My first "in my head," was the two buckets , forks, a land plane ( cheaper than a power rake to start) then auger then power rake. I'm not sure if even use a grapple? Maybe on some brush..? Just not sure if its be a much used item
     
  3. AWilsonCreativeServices

    AWilsonCreativeServices LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 324

    I have more attachments for my machine that I probably should admit to. Some things like a dirt or tooth bucket are imperative for every day operation, while other attachments like the boring unit to go under sidewalks and driveways don’t get used much, but you really need them when you need them.

    The only way to figure out what will benefit you best is to buy the bare minimum you described and then rent as needed, which will allow you to “demo” them without the obligation to purchase.

    I will say this-I bought my first dingo used, and it came with six attachments which included a tiller and Toro soil cultivator/conditioner. They are great to have, but it was not until a few years later that I bought another machine used with some attachments that I got a Harley rake. The Harley rake really is my go-to attachment 75% of the time for grading, contouring, and soil prep.
     
    Ticolawnllc and woodlawnservice like this.
  4. Ticolawnllc

    Ticolawnllc LawnSite Senior Member
    from Wall NJ
    Messages: 505

    Definitely rent what you can. The grapple comes in handy on tear outs. It will eliminate a guy when moving brush, ivy, roots or leaves. It’s next to impossible to get a good bucket full of this stuff with out someone holding the materials till you curl the bucket. Same goes for moving concrete.

    I ran my tractor for 6 years without a grapple. The machine sat at the shop most the time. I put 400 hours in that time. When I put a grapple on the last two years I had it I put 300hours a year. The machine became 3 times as effective. While I loaded material, the guys cleaned. It’s like adding guy to your crew.

    I’m hoping this year to add a power rake. I sold my tractor last spring and got a bobcatmt85.
     
    fatboynormmie likes this.
  5. rclawn

    rclawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,419

    @Ticolawnllc can you elaborate on the stump buckets beating up the machine? I was honestly about to buy one but now I'm having second thoughts.
     
    woodlawnservice likes this.
  6. Ticolawnllc

    Ticolawnllc LawnSite Senior Member
    from Wall NJ
    Messages: 505

    On my tractor from the jerking back-and-forth and the jolt to the hydraulics I ended up rupturing my oil cooler. It’s not as effective as you would think. It is possible to take out a stump with it. you will be prying on the roots and every time the roots let go because they break your machine will fall on its own weight over and over and over again. Jolting of the lift her arms isn’t that big a deal in my opinion. But think about your engine and hydraulic pumps going through that. I would use a stump bucket to remove bushes with a full-size skid steer that’s as far as I would go. It comes in handy to do a trench every now and then but that’s about it.
     
  7. BrandonV

    BrandonV LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,220

    i just bought a concrete mixer for ours... haven't been this excited over an attachment for a while. our old drum mixer blew up last year so it was time for a new one.
     
  8. Ticolawnllc

    Ticolawnllc LawnSite Senior Member
    from Wall NJ
    Messages: 505

    Minis like tractors are just a power source. Really they can powers anything. The thing to look out for is that the attachment company did their homework on the engineering. Mini attachments are more expensive because they have to drive hydro motor. PTO drive a gear box. Gear boxes are cheaper but they only go in one direction. The hydro motors can go back and forth.

    so if you have an auger with a hydro motor that can be used for cement mixer it should save you quite a bit.
     
  9. fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,470

    The Toro style grapple is my most used attachment. I find uses for it for so many different things. The Eterra E40 with thumb mini backhoe is very handy and great for tear outs . Of coarse a bucket is also needed imo .
    I would like to find /try a grapple bucket .
     
    rclawn likes this.
  10. fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,470

    Before I would buy a stump bucket seriously look at the Eterra E40 backhoe attachment. Yes it will cost you more than a stump bucket but it will do Soooooo much more . For ripping up stumps Eterra also sells a ripper tooth that switches out with the bucket and when used with the thumb is a root busting momma!!! Also the bucket /ripper changes out are super easy and fast. Eterra also sells a grapple for the E40 but do not waste your money on it for a mini. They are better on a bigger skid steer as it is very heavy.
     
    rclawn likes this.

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