My customers Paver patio Heaved!

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by gofastjd, Nov 27, 2018.

  1. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,750

    No more landscaping. It was all a good stepping stone.
     
    Mdirrigation and hort101 like this.
  2. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,750

    Hence “edge restraint preperation”.

    A loose shoulder, aka - deficient compaction.

    One component is reliant on another.

    Regardless, House foundation problems or not, the pictures show that the pavers are sliding away, subsequent of deficient edge restraint.

    So, now the problem has been zeroed into deficient edge restraint. And from there - what makes the edge restraint deficient?
     
    hort101 likes this.
  3. TPendagast

    TPendagast LawnSite Fanatic
    Male
    Messages: 16,099

    To... construction?
    Home remodeling?
    Executive security and body guard service?
     
  4. 4 seasons lawn&land

    4 seasons lawn&land LawnSite Gold Member
    from NY
    Messages: 3,694

    Maybe the backfill is still settling from all the pier digging
     
  5. TPendagast

    TPendagast LawnSite Fanatic
    Male
    Messages: 16,099

    Yea
    But “settling” sinks
    What part of the pictures shows a sunken area?
     
  6. 4 seasons lawn&land

    4 seasons lawn&land LawnSite Gold Member
    from NY
    Messages: 3,694


    I thought it did both. Pics look like it went all over the place. If it only went up then has to be water under there right? That or someone said earthquake. You would probably know about that. Does the property slope toward the patio and not swale out? Water has to be saturating the base somehow.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  7. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,750

    Sounds like there is some history with the property and house.

    From being a part of this forum, it’s been my observation that hardscape guys are quick to want to land any job that comes across their desk.

    Once you have your hands in the pot, you’re responsible.

    A good contractor must always think “liability liability liability” day in and day out. And must be readily able to say “no” to even the biggest jobs.

    Someone on here once quoted someone else. Not certain who. But it was this:

    “I made my first million saying yes to everyone, and I made my second million saying no to everyone”.

    I’m not implying this post to the post creator. I’m implying this post to all contractors, more-so the rookies.
     
  8. Charles

    Charles Moderator Staff Member
    Messages: 11,782

    The OP hasn't been back since last Wednesday
     
  9. zedosix

    zedosix LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,690

    I don't believe for an instant that edge restraint had a thing to do with this. Yes its important but don't think it was responsible for what your showing us.
    No matter how strong the edge restraint it would have no bearing on the ground shifting or heaving. Its your responsibility to find a solution. I for one would at minimum lift the affected areas and reset. Its going to be a major pita with that poly sand.
    When you put interlock up against the clay brick around the house, don't put sand there, you'll want to either put a piece of platon or blueskin barrier to keep the moisture off the house brick.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  10. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,750

    I hope he’s ok
     

Share This Page