My new building

turf hokie

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Metro NY
David,

As much as you think it costs and as much as it hurts. At least you own it. Your 12k budget still doesnt add up to 6 months of rent for me.:cry:

Looking for other options, just cant seem to find any that are viable.
 
OP
D

David Gretzmier

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Fayetteville,AR
The building will be lap sided with 1 inch thick, 6 inch wide rough cut oak. I will side the upper part of where the new meets the old, there will be a new gutter that just barely touches the new poles, and the siding will feed water runoff from the new side into the gutters. this is only a temporary solution.

next year I will run new roof joists/purlins from the right header of the new to the peak of the old building, new metal roof to that peak, and side the front of the old building to match the new. At that point the whole thing is enclosed and water tight and one structure rather than 2.
 
OP
D

David Gretzmier

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Fayetteville,AR
to do the above mentioned lap siding for the new building only , will require about 5000 square foot of 1 inch thick by 6 inch wide x 8-9 foot oak boards. cost wise this is another 2500 bucks, along with about 300 bucks for stainless steel #7x3inch square drive or star drive screws.

I am hoping to get this done this year as well, but I can do this on as money available basis as well.
 

hotrod1965

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
SE Michigan
wow, you have more snow than we do right now....


just got back from carribean and was gonna post a picture, and I think it is attached. but If it does not work, don't throw rocks at me. I will describe what is happening in the photo. the poles are up, concreted in well, some of the headers and knee braces are in. it looks like he has put the headers on one side of the poles on the sides, and no headers yet on the front or back. he did an excellent job getting very close to my current storage building, just leaving enough room for gutters to go in between the new and old building.

He used hot dipped galvanized ring shank 3 1/2 inch .131 nails, and was not stingy with them either, not just tacking them on, but probably 12 per end of 2x 12 header. the knee braces appear to have 5 nails at each end .I will still drill through and bolt all the headers through the poles w/ 4 5/8 inch x 11 inch long grade 5 bolts for each pole, and drill and bolt 2 at the top of the knee braces through the headers, and then use 3/8" x 4 inch long lag bolts at the bottoms of the knee braces to the poles. that should absolutely stop any thought of racking.

again, going to disneyworld with my family tomorrow for 12 days, I hope he can finish the headers and braces by the time I get back, so I can get the header bolting done and start modifying/welding the steel trusses for the roof.

I will try to pay the builder for the work he has done to theis point and update cost if that happens.
 
OP
D

David Gretzmier

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Fayetteville,AR
updates- having to make some changes.

The trusses I planned on using were used 4:12 pitch metal scissor trusses that are used in chicken houses. They come in halves ( 1 7 foot leg and 1/2 span with bolt holes to attatch to other half) with the legs already welded on them. I was going to cut off the legs and use only the tops. since they are used, I doubled the amount normally used when new.

went to pick up the metal trusses and called this morning to confirm. when I arrived at the city 45 minutes away with my helper, box van, generator, circ. saw, cord, sawhorses, to cut off the legs of the trusses. He has only 5 full spans of the 34 foot wide ones. I wasted a half a day discovering this and now I have to go to another more expensive used source or use new and more expensive new wood trusses.

I'll know prices tomorrow. but I would count on it being more.

it gets better.

I had asked my builder to leave me through bolt spaces when he used an air nailer to put up the headers. he did not, and after trying to do just one post and not being able to drill through all the nails on both sides, I have had to give up on it. luckily he has not put both sides of headers on the 12 posts on the old building side, so I will put those headers up, be super careful and only tack nails at the very top and bottom, can drill and bolt those. the others will have to be lag bolted, which is only 25 percent as stong.

how frustrating to buy grade 5, 11 inch long 5/8 bolts ( and the washers, and the nuts,) that are super strong, and not be able to use them.

got about 30 lags in today, will make more progress tomorrow.
 
OP
D

David Gretzmier

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Fayetteville,AR
All headers either bolted or lagged, all knee braces bolted, lagged, done, all headers in, and prices are in on different trusses-

and yes, of course, way higher. 89 bucks each for 34 foot wide scissor truss, with 5:12 pitch on top and 2.5:12 on bottom, 2 foot overhang, built for 4 foot centers. 23 trusses is about 2100 bucks+200 tax

also got a bid for 99 bucks per scissor truss for 6:12 pitch on top and 3:12 on bottom for 4 foot centers. 2300 bucks +250 tax

or put another way, should I pay 250 extra bucks for 6 inches more space on my 10 foot wide rack in the middle of the building? probably not.

budget buster- 1100 more bucks for trusses. ouch. put another way, that 1100 bucks is almost half of what it would cost to purchase the rough cut oak for the siding of the entire building.

I may have an unexplored 3rd option, I have found some used steel 4:12 pitch40 foot trusses that i could modify to have a 3-4 foot overhang and then span the 34 foot shop. since those are made to span 40 feet, and originally 10 foot centers, they are heavier, I might put those on 8 foot centers and go to 2x6 purlins. cost wise might be 1100 for 12 trusses and a bump of 300 bucks for going to 2x6's from 2x4's. and more headroom between trusses for storage....
 
OP
D

David Gretzmier

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Fayetteville,AR
Thought I'd update this thread to basically say that not much has happened as I have been gone almost 4 weeks out of the last 5. I am still waiting on the metal trusses as I found a gentleman that was tearing down a 40 foot wide chicken house. that should be happening this week or next. I will update when I have them on property and take some photos.
 
OP
D

David Gretzmier

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Fayetteville,AR
Ok. Finally got trusses and started modifying them for my building. I will try to take some photo's today. The trusses are used, a scissor style steel web truss, and came with short legs that we have already removed. For the record, if you have to cut a bit of angle iron steel, a Dewalt XP 7 1/4 inch metal abrasive blade is the way to go. I went through a c-5 carbide metal cutter blade and a cheaper abrasive blade cutting off the first 3 legs 24. I cut the next 21 legs off using 2 Dewalt blades. and they look like they could cut another 20 legs.

the trusses come in halves and bolt together in the middle, They have L brackets welded on top to screw the 2x4 purlins up top 24" on center, and they also come with "k" braces, basically legths of angle iron that bolt to the bottom of the truss and then screw at an angle to the purlins as well to keep things from racking.

I will be working this week to weld brackets on the bottom chord of the trusses to rest them on the 2x12 headers and posts. since these are trusses made for a 40 foot wide building, they are a bit heavier built than the original 34 foot wide ones I wanted. they are also designed for a 10 foot spacing, and I will shrink that to 8, along with shrinking the span to 34 foot instead of 40. So it will be overbuilt a bit.

I am not going to cut off the extra length, but rather cantilever the bottom and top chord over the header, and have a 4 1/2 foot over hang. This will actually help me out on snow load over the main roof, as snow load outside of the header actually creates an upforce on the top chord. another upside is this longer overhang gets me closer to "marrying" the roof pitch of the new building to the roof pitch of the other when I continue the run down the roof. when I get the trusses up I will take a photo and explain that better.

The fun part is welding the brackets on there. needless to say the entire weight of the roof will fall on my welding skills for these brackets, so it kinda has to be right. I also have to allow some wiggle room as the posts may be dead on straight at the bottom, but not so much 20 feet up. The important thing will be for the roofline and trusses to all light up perfectly for the purlin backets.
added some 1/2 bolts and some screws and such, about 50 bucks, and total
cost at this point, 12 trusses, 85 each, plus a helper for 6 hours to cut and load unload, plus a few metal cutting blades, 1160 added to total, $7562 so far.
 
OP
D

David Gretzmier

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Fayetteville,AR
gonna try to post some new photo's of what is currently going on. I finally got the used steel trusses from the guy who takes down chicken houses. They are for 40 foot wide building with an 18 inch overhang, and the 40 foot width would include a 20 inch wide leg on the inside. I cut off the 7 foot tall legs, and that leaves me with a truss that has about an 18 inch overhang on the bottom chord, and about a 4 foot overhang on the top chord, or the top where the purlins and metal goes.

if you need a primer on roofing 101- the purlins are 2x4's that run on thier skinny side from truss to truss. they are screwed into the trusses in the small metal plates that run perpendicular on the top chord in the photo's. the purlins are spaced every 2 feet, and there are 12 of them per half truss.

I also included a close up of how I have modified these trusses to go on my building. on the bottom chord, I have welded 3 pieces of angle iron. one 5 inch piece runs out, and 2 15 inch pieces span that and the bottom chord. this creates a level place to set the trusses on the top pf my two headers and posts.

I have predrilled one of the pieces of angle iron to accept 3/8 inch lag bolts. the holes are spaced 1 and 1/2 inches apart, and the 15 inch space allows the builder to deal with the fact the top of the 20 foot wall height varies by 2 inches in width because of the 6 inch poles at the top warping or twisting. so although the poles plus headers will be 8 1/2 inches wide, I nearly doubled that to perfectly square/true up all the trusses for a perfect ridge and flat roof sides.

If you had seen these poles when I got them, you would have seen they were ramrod straight. and they were. but even though the headers have been on them, they want to go the way they want to go. so the metal brackets at the bottom of the trusses allow for that. the poles are just about perfect at the bottom, you could run a string and get less than a 1/4 inch play all the way down it's 88 foot length. I hope the roof will be the same.

since these trusses are designed to fo on a 40 foot wide building and this is a 34, they are much heavier to handle the larger span, and I went with 8 foot on center instead of 4 foot centers. so 24 halves or 12 full spans. I have finished welding brackets on 21 of 24 halves, and will finish them tomorrow if weather cooperates. I will then pressure wash them and spray them with ospho, which is a rust converter/black primer to stop the rusting and give them a decent finish. I will finish that process next week, and the trusses hopefully go up 2 weeks from today.

I have chosen a dark green metal roof, the new white polycarbonate ridge light ( more on that later) and tan trim. The oak siding will have a reddish stain, so I think all of that will look good together. I did a mock up of the oak siding that I will take a photo of tomorrow on one wall.

Let's see if the photo's attatch.

truss small 1.jpg


truss small 2.jpg
 
Top