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Ok here is the situation: It has been really dry around here and work has been real slow, so the last couple of days i have been messing around in the garage to keep myself busy. I run 2 echo srm-230s straight shaft trimmers they work great, but I have an echo GT-2400 curved shaft that is about 8 yrs old. It stopped running a few yrs ago I never had time to work on it so it sat for 2-3yrs. I would like to have it running as a just in case trimmer or when I get behind and can stick another guy on it. It starts up and kinda runs, but for it to run it has to be a full throttle and the choke has to be all the way on! This results in hardly any power, if you want power you have to toggle the choke on and off if you leave it off the engine dies. The carb is in proper adjustment according to the manufacturers specs, the air filter, fuel filter, and spark plug is good! What the heck is goin on here?!
 

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Spend about $10 (+ -) for a carb rebuild kit.

Take the carb off and spray it down with carb cleaner and then blow it out with air. Make sure that once you remove all jets, needles, and other stuff, you clean and blow it out again.

After you put in all the new parts, adjust the high/low to specs.

You might want to also check the exhaust ports for carbon build-up.

Put fresh gas in it (add a little sea foam) and fire it up. After you run it a little, re-adjust the high/low settings.
 

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Sounds like a partial blockage. Start the engine and turn the H adjuster anti-clock until the engine starts running lumpy then slowly screw back in until the engine revs peak, this will be too rich so back off 1/4 turn, then let it go to idle and do the same to the L adjuster. Finally return and repeat the H adjuster. Reset the tick over screw if necessary.
If none of this has any effect on the engine you'll have to dismantle and clean, do as the other guys suggested also.
Good luck Phil:)
 

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Hi OSU,

If it has been stored that long, I would tune it up. Here is my procedure.

FIRST AND FOREMOST ---- remove the muffler and inspect the inside of the engine for any damage. Pay close attention to the exhaust side of the piston, the ports near the bottom of the engine, the intake port inside (where the carb mounts). If there is any damage or if you see gray (rather than chrome) anywhere, then stop and save your time and money.

If the engine looks good then:

1. Replace the diaphragms, needle, metering lever, and internal carb screen. I adjust my metering lever so that when the tab end is depressed ½ down, the other end begins lifting the needle. (I find many new levers do not activate the needle until ¾ down. Adjusting allows for more fuel and I feel that it helps in starting easier). Replace the purge pump bulb.
2. Change the fuel filter in the gas tank.
3. Change the fuel lines. I find that if I run “small trimmer line” through the gas tank hole/s then through the gas cap hole, and run a tapered gas line over the trimmer line, that this guides the gas line in the proper position to pull it through.
4. Do some testing on it now before putting a new plug and air filter on it
5. Oops, forgot, remove the spark arrestor screen (in the muffler) or clean it and put back on (these tend to clog faster after they get carbonized the first time).


I would test the air vent. The white thing on the end of one of the hoses. It is shaped like miniature whiskey bottle. DO NOT USE COMPRESSED AIR TO CLEAN. Clean it, suck and blow on it. It should allow air in, but not allow air out.

Connect the fuel line to carb, press purge pump bulb and see if excess fuel is squirted out of overflow nipple without a lot of air bubbles. If there is no flow or excess air in the flow, there is a repair to disable the purge pump. When the duckbill valves in this purge pump go bad, it can drive you nuts trying to figure it out.

I start my adjustments by bottoming out my needles LIGHTLY – STRESS LIGHTLY. (The needles engages the carb housing. The needles are steel and the housing is aluminum. The carburetor can be damaged if you twist screw/s too tight). Then turn them left 1 1/8 turn. From here the motor should start and run. The low speed jet (screw nearest the engine) is to idle and get you from low speed to high speed smoothly. The high speed jet (screw furthest from the engine) is to give fuel to run at high speed. Adjust the high speed with the throttle wide open (never longer than a few seconds). Turn needle either direction until engine runs best (again never run longer than a few seconds at full throttle). After locating the position on the high speed needle where it runs best, turn the needle (again at full throttle) to the left (more fuel) until it begins to cut out ever so slightly. If uncertain, turn it a little more left (rich) than right (lean). Your fuel is your power source and it also works as a coolant as it flows through your engine to the combustion chamber.

After a few minutes of work on the job (or maybe 1 or 2 hours), you may have to readjust the carb.

Good luck,
de
 
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