New business

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by Leeder's Edge, Feb 12, 2019.

  1. Leeder's Edge

    Leeder's Edge LawnSite Member
    Messages: 4

    Been trying to figure out a career and I think starting a lawn business is the career for me. I plan on getting a job with a lawn business for about a year to see how it goes. And by then i should have about 30k saved up to get new equipment but i also need to budget for a truck, trailer and everything else. Any suggestions on what brand or specific equipment to get would be helpful. Also ill take any other advice. Thanks!
     
  2. Oxmow

    Oxmow LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,091

    Put that year behind you then come back and ask the same question. Although I think it will have been answered already.

    Oh, and take some night business classes while you wait!
     
    jetson and hort101 like this.
  3. guitarman2420

    guitarman2420 LawnSite Senior Member
    Male, from Midlothian, VA
    Messages: 676

    The fact that you are willing to invest a year to learn the business is admirable. What region or area are you from? Each area has it's own particular issues. As far as equipment, etc, my advice would be to standardize with a brand (for parts) & find a dealer who will support you.
     
    jetson and hort101 like this.
  4. OP
    OP
    Leeder's Edge

    Leeder's Edge LawnSite Member
    Messages: 4

    Midwest, particularly Nebraska. I figured i would spend about 10k for a truck so just trying to figure out what i could afford for lawn equipment and whats the best for that kind of budget
     
  5. guitarman2420

    guitarman2420 LawnSite Senior Member
    Male, from Midlothian, VA
    Messages: 676

    I personally have standardized on Toro/Exmark for mowers & Stihl for handhelds. Different strokes for different folks, I'm sure; but you can't go entirely wrong with a national leader who has been in business for a long time and almost always has a good dealer network in your area. I have some Gravelly equipment; but getting service on it is difficult.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Leeder's Edge

    Leeder's Edge LawnSite Member
    Messages: 4

    Thanks! This is helpful, i know I have a toro dealer close by me so ill have to look into that.
     
    guitarman2420 likes this.
  7. jetson

    jetson LawnSite Member
    Messages: 55

    Pretty impressive u have the discipline to invest a year into a lawn company first. It’s good because u will learn a lot but yet not enough. I got in this biz this way worked for a guy for 2 years and picked his brain on pricing.. I think that’s the hardest part of the game for newbies. Learn time management and reasonable expectations for time too. When u roll solo it’s all on u to make money.

    My advice on equipment personally Is to buy new unless ur very good at fixing lawn mowers.


    1. U can save capital. Cash on hand will be king in the beginning. Plus ur customer will not pay every week. Haha.. maybe it’s eill mine don’t! Lol.. Biz will be slow in the beginning and financing a mower at 0-1.9 percent is amazing plus ur mower will depreciate slowly and U can get ur money back with a small loss if I go out of biz..


    2. Warranty 2 years commercial coverage is worth it.

    3. Invest in quality weed eaters blowers ect.. ur gonna be tempted to save money but it will be the death of you if u skip over quality because price.

    U could spend time in the evening learning as much as possible about fixing ur mowers I guess.. me and my mowers don’t get along! .. I can do a lot of things very well but I can’t do crap on my mowers! Lol or with cars! Makes sense I guess.. but also some time learning if you really want to do lawn care.. I’ve met a million people who started today gone tomorrow because I guess they thought they were gonna get rich quick.. good luck..
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Leeder's Edge

    Leeder's Edge LawnSite Member
    Messages: 4

    I don't expect to make a lot in the beginning but i hope to make enough in 2 or 3 years to get by. How do you all set your prices? I read some people use a measuring wheel to measure the size of the lawn and build a quote that way.
     
  9. LawnGuy35

    LawnGuy35 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 197

    My advice would be to keep a part-time job the first few years, at least. Unless you’re fortunate enough to book yourself solid in the first year, money will be tight. Plus you’ll need money to get through prolonged droughts ... plus lack of snow if you plan to offer snow removal in winter. That’s a biggie that many starting out in this industry don’t account for. They assume because it’s warm outside the grass will always be green and growing.

    Good luck! It’s great being your own boss.
     
    jetson likes this.

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