New Construction=Trying to establish new yard as a noobie

Fette

LawnSite Member
Good morning all!
An old mowing client just moved back here to Indy and bought a new house. Builder did sod in front, seed in back. Sod is looking good, seed is struggling. Builder used straw then put that plastic matting over the top to hold the straw in place and at this stage, I am struggling with what to tell her to do. Here in Hamilton County, most new yards are clay beds (they strip the good toppsoil off an sell it) and part of me wants to get my aerator out and just till her yard up, re-apply seed, cover with peat and add starter fert- basically start over. However, not looking forward to digging that plastic mat stuff out of my aerator or risking her $$$ when at this stage, it may make sense to just wait until fall. She has a sprinkler system and would be diligent but I am new to the fert and seed side of the business so any thoughts you all are willing to share woud be appreciated!

Thank you!!
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Indiana has good soil. Clay is fine--if you can grow corn--or --for that matter weeds--you can grow grass. Plenty of water and plenty of fertilizer should bring it around--if she irrigates every day.
Expect weeds of course--summer annuals and the usual tall weeds that occur with a new seed situation. Most of those weeds can be killed with a weed control application later in the summer. Tall weeds do not withstand mowing. Summer weeds and crabgrass do not withstand winter--in any case.
If she will spend the money, feel free to broadcast additional seed. Sow 6 pounds per thousand sqft, since you will not be able to till the soil nor aerate. Seed with a higher quality mix--darker green and more disease resistant.
Do not bother with peat moss--it does not help.

Fall is good--but if it is irrigated--summer is fine as the soil will be warm for quick germination.
 
OP
F

Fette

LawnSite Member
Good morning! Thank you Riggle!! I am sorry for the delayed response. I was trying to beat the rain. With that netting being exposed would you tear it all up or just leave it there and throw the seed on top? I was not sure if by sow you mean tear the netting up and use a seeder or just throw it on top.
Thank you also for your insight in the peat. Given my vast experience (one small 20x20 instal :)) the peat seemed to work fine.
Gardiner, to answer your question, the yard is maybe 60 days old and yes, you can see the netting.
I was doing some other research and I see where some folks spray Tenacity. Would you recommend spraying that before seeding to help with the weeds?

Thank you both very much. This site has helped me so much! I am grateful for your insights.

Take care!
 

gardiner

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
MASSILLON OHIO
I would remove the netting you can see. Run a mower over it. To break up the straw. Letting the light get to the seed. Giving it more time and water.
Maybe a little fertilizer. I find that grass comes up best when planted. Late September or early March.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
I am not sure. I do not think there is a practical way to remove the netting. I suggest seed through the netting with a broadcast spreader. Cut only the spots where it is more than 3 inches high. Sharp knife? Machete? String trimmer? Whatever works.
Sow a high rate of seed, say 6 pounds per thousand. Irrigate well to push the seed down to the soil.
Start mowing when the new grass is about 3 inches high. The netting is supposed to be invisible after 6 weeks. Buried under the dense new grass.

Supposedly the netting biodegrades or is destroyed by sunlight. Do not remove it.

 
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gardiner

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
MASSILLON OHIO
I am not sure. I do not think there is a practical way to remove the netting. I suggest seed through the netting with a broadcast spreader. Cut only the spots where it is more than 3 inches high. Sharp knife? Machete? String trimmer? Whatever works.
Sow a high rate of seed, say 6 pounds per thousand. Irrigate well to push the seed down to the soil.
Start mowing when the new grass is about 3 inches high. The netting is supposed to be invisible after 6 weeks. Buried under the dense new grass.

Supposedly the netting biodegrades or is destroyed by sunlight. Do not remove it.

I only say to remove . what netting that you can see. That you can still see it after 60 days . Makes me wonder if the straw is 4 inches thick under the netting. Something not right. Gotta get in there to see what going on.
 
OP
F

Fette

LawnSite Member
Thank you both!!! I will go back over there this weekend in between storms and look closer at the netting, get her a quote on seed and then have at it!!

Have a great weekend!!!
 

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