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New lawn problem - worms???

BPH

LawnSite Member
Location
uk
Hi, I am new here and hope it is ok to ask for some help.

I had my old messy garden stripped, some trees removed, rotavated, top soil layed and new turf put down. This was watered correctly. I think I have worms making a mess of my nice new lawn. You can see little piles with worm looking 'squiggles'. They leave patches all over the lawn that can be seen on the photos.

The guy who layed the turf said this is very good for the lawn. It is not good for me who paid alot to see a nice lush green lawn!

Can anybody confirm that these are worms, if indeed they are good for the grass, if they are able to be gotten rid of or if I am stuck with them.

Also any hints and tips to help keep it looking nice!

Thanks,

Bee









 

billslawn89

LawnSite Bronze Member
are there moles making tunnels just below the ground. thats what it looks like in the picture with the soil piles. if it is moles, then you have grubs in your lawn, which the moles are tunneling for to eat. worms are good for the soil because they naturally areate the soil.
 
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BPH

LawnSite Member
Location
uk
Those photos are a few months old, I will take newer ones tomorrow and post them.

I have no idea if I have moles, but if that's what you suspect they are after I post new photos tomorrow, can I get rid of the grubs and make the moles go elsewhere?

I am glad worms are good for the soil. Fingers crossed the photos I post tomorrow will give you a better idea of what my problem is.

Many thanks for your input.
 

Jason Rose

LawnSite Fanatic
Earth worms aka. night crawlers.

Yes, they present a problem in large numbers. They are a problem here in certian lawns. Their castings (yes that's what passes through them and out the other end, is deposited on the top of the ground as their end is poked out of their hole. They can do significant damage when they are large, making a lawn very hard to walk on when it's dry (the castings get very hard) and make mowing with smaller mowers a very rough adventure.

Yes, they are good for the soil. Free aeration! But when they get to that point it's hard to maintain any sort of good turf, they DO eat the base of the grass plants as well.

Unfortunately there's no LEGAL way to kill them. I believe there may be a restricted use pesticide for them still though... There are a couple products left on the market that are inadvertenly TOXIC to earthworms (that you typically find on the store shelves). For the common good though I won't mention names, because there are folks that will flip on the flame thrower and fry me :) I'll post a document for you to look at shortly.
 

MowinginEureka

LawnSite Member
Location
Eureka, CA
This is the perfect time of the year that yards start to get grub damage. Usually, the damage is because of animals trying to eat the grubs. You can use a flat spade to cut back a sample of turf. Count the grubs in the top 3 inches of soil and replace and water the turf. If you take a 6" X 6" sample (1/4 of a square foot), a grub density of more than 2-3 per sample probably warrants treatment. Take a dozen or so samples throughout the lawn area to determine which areas may need treatment. Many lawns can handle a lot of grubs, but if they are causing damage, they need to be treated. Just do a google image search for grubs, and that will give you an idea of what they look like. All you have to do is go to a store that sells lawncare products, like an ACE hardware or someplace and ask for Grub Control. You will need a good drop spreader, but it should get them under control.
 
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BPH

LawnSite Member
Location
uk
Hi again, many thanks for the replies. It has been hammering down with rain recently so have taken some snaps. My friend who used to work for a lawn company is pretty sure they are worms. He says because it has been so wet recently all the worms are near the surface. He thinks once the weather dries up they will reduce in appearance. I hope so. What do you think....?




















Also, these little beasts have popped up! What are they and how can I kill them off without damaging my lawn?



 

Jason Rose

LawnSite Fanatic
Yes, the rain/excess moisture will usually cause the worm activity to be higher.

Those "weeds" there are Hyacinths. They are a flower, grow from a bulb that's in the ground 3 to 5 inches deep. Just dig 'em up and transplant them into a flower bed. They are nice because they put on color sooo early in the spring.
 
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BPH

LawnSite Member
Location
uk
I have no flower beds. I like the idea of flowers growing directly on the lawn. The last photo shows them raising the turf as they push through. Can I create holes for them to grow through and push the turf down around them? Or just leave them in the hope the lawn will settle down around them?

Many thanks for all the helpful comments, I am a complete novice so appreciate the advice in simple terms.
 
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