Not enough/bad quality seed?

Freaky Fido

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Northeast USA
I agree with Freaky Fido.
Of course, Kentucky bluegrass is not originally from Kentucky--probably from Europe--brought over by early settlers.
Perennial ryegrass is fine--but it does not spread. It does not have rhizomes like bluegrass has.
A top-quality bluegrass is a good start. It germinates slowly and is slow for the first few weeks. Be sure it claims good disease resistance--to several lawn diseases. Denmark has some good seed companies. A blend intended for rugby, or football is a good choice. (Called soccer in the US).

Be sure the seed is not too old. It might lose about 2 percent per month just in storage--so the germination could have been lower than expected.
Feel free to plant plenty of seed--no harm results (in my opinion) the strongest grass plants will survive.

However, if the grass becomes or remains thin for long periods--I suspect that shade could be the problem. Trim the trees--reduce the shade. Perennial rye does not do well in the shade, bluegrass is only fair in the shade. The top-rated chewings and fine fescue cultivars, like "Shadow" for instance would probably do fine.
It's an honor that you agree with me. You have a LOT of knowledge about turfgrass.

Just to add to what you said about trimming trees. In my experience trimming the lower branches up to the 12 to 15 foot high range can make a big difference, letting a little light sneak in. That's if removing some or thinning them isn't a realistic option.
 
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LockdownLawn

LawnSite Member
Location
Germany
Huge thanks first of all to everyone of you for chiming in! So much input in this short amount of time is basically why I went and registered on a US site, to answer your question @phasthound, the internet just works so much better in English – I didn't even find anything specifically dedicated to lawns in my language, let alone a professionals community like this. Except for your more or less permanent summer states I figure generally the same rules apply.

Having learned about the different grass types now, which I should have in the first place instead of simply trusting product descriptions, I think it's clear what's been going on here. @Freaky Fido you're definitely right, I seem to have pretty much exclusively perennial ryegrass (lolium perenne) – the other, slower sprouting seeds just never made it.

Shade shouldn't be an issue if the PR usually doesn't do well there, like you say @RigglePLC since the plants I do have look perfectly fine.

Instead of a 10% Kentucky bluegrass (poa pratensis) blend with mostly more PR which they all seem to be (advertised for sports indeed) I'd just overseed with a bag of pure bluegrass that I found on Amazon with decent reviews I guess.

What's confusing me now though are the two opposing opinions on the amount of seed. I've read warnings all over the internet about how too much seed can ruin everything, but maybe we're talking absurd amounts here, I don't know. I mean if the spreading does work, all I'd risk by going careful again would be losing some more time (which obviously I have too much of anyways lol)
 
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Freaky Fido

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Northeast USA
Huge thanks first of all to everyone of you for chiming in! So much input in this short amount of time is basically why I went and registered on a US site, to answer your question @phasthound, the internet just works so much better in English – I didn't even find anything specifically dedicated to lawns in my language, let alone a professionals community.

Having learned about the different grass types now, which I should have in the first place instead of just trusting package descriptions, I think it's clear what's been going on here. @Freaky Fido you're definitely right, I seem to have pretty much exclusively perennial ryegrass (lolium perenne) – the other, slower sprouting seeds just never made it.

Shade shouldn't be an issue if the PR usually doesn't do well there, like you say @RigglePLC since the plants I do have look perfectly fine.

Instead of a 10% Kentucky bluegrass (poa pratensis) blend with mostly more PR which they all seem to be (advertised for sports indeed) I'd just overseed with a bag of pure bluegrass that I found on Amazon with decent reviews I guess.

What's confusing me now though are the two opposing opinions on the amount of seed. I've read warnings all over the internet about how too much seed can ruin everything, but maybe we're talking absurd amounts here, I don't know. I mean if the spreading does work, all I'd risk by going careful again would be losing some more time (which obviously I have too much of anyways lol)
A large excess of seed can indeed be a problem. I've seen this when my toddler helped me seed and he just threw a handful in one place and where seed washes out from heavy rains and all deposits in one spot. It will choke itself out. But putting it down at the full rate you would for establishing a new lawn instead of half rate for an overseeing shouldn't cause a problem.
 
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LockdownLawn

LawnSite Member
Location
Germany
Hey guys so it's been four weeks now since I put down that bluegrass seed and not a single plant has developed so far :-(

I've been watering 1-2 times a day to keep it wet (totally wrong regime for my existing grass but I guess not a big deal with an established root system right?) might have missed a day once or twice or been a little late when it was fairly hot outside but hard to imagine this could have killed all of it everywhere right away . . . No better explanation though except maybe really horrible seed quality (or a combination of both?)

Not sure whether I should give it another shot with the same bag of bluegrass now that temperatures are expected to stay lower and I'd be able to keep the seed wet 100% all the time . . . or . . . throw down some of this crazy stuff I just found out about online:


Regenerating perennial ryegrass :-O

Rhizome spreading ryegrass, anybody ever heard anything about this?
 

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