Nutsedge help needed

zooba72

LawnSite Member
Location
New York
Hi Everyone,

I'm back again almost one year after posting a similar issue. Last year I had nutsedge all over my front lawn and after consulting with this board I used SedgeHammer which appeared to have effectively killed it off. Within about 10 days of the application it was browning out. Fast forward, this year my lawn started out looking good, but now that July has rolled around, the nutsedge is back in the exact same spots - it may have even spread.

Since this is my 3rd year dealing with this, I'm pretty much done. I wanted to bounce an idea off this thread. I used a weed killer concentrate with Glyphosphate on a few areas and it killed everything very quickly. I'm planning to kill the entire lawn, rototill and seed in the fall - Will that work ?? Or will the Rhizomes live on ?
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Thank you
 

Mark Oomkes

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
Nut sedge doesn't spread by rhizomes.

The nutlets in the soil can remain dormant for 7 years and then grow. You can only perform post emergent control.
 
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zooba72

LawnSite Member
Location
New York
Thanks Mark - so it's currently all over my lawn, what do you suggest I use. Will Glyphosphate kill it ?
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Hire a pro that has the proper equipment, experience and chemicals.

I am not sure Roundup would solve the problem.

Failing that...The many nutlets, roots and rhizomes remain under the grass in the soil--about 2 inches deep. Don't give up. Keep at it with the Sedgehammer. Be ready to repeat the treatment early and often, if (when) the sedge reappears. Be persistent. Knock it down early and often. Do not let the tops send food to the roots. Hit it when it is young and tender, less than 2 inches tall. Be sure to include some non-ionic surfactant in the spray solution to wet the sedge thoroughly. Avoid the run-off of the spray liquid due to the vertical leaves and waxy leaf surface. Calibrate your sprayer carefully to be sure you are getting the full dosage.

A new nutsedge product, sulfentrazone, has recently come on the market. Fast acting. Here is the retail product.
https://www.domyown.com/bonide-sedge-ender-concentrate-p-3626.html?sub_id=3738

And a third product, Mesotrione has just appeared.

https://www.domyown.com/prime-source-meso-4sc-select-p-17377.html

Keep in mid that nutsedge is a warm weather plant. It arises from the roots about when your local temperatures reach about 80 degrees. It dies back to the roots when night temps fall back below about 45.

Don't be afraid to hand pull a few (or a few hundred)--you get a certain amount of evil satisfaction as you discard a bushel or two of dead nutsedge. Get the new sprouts quick when they reappear. Your kids want to earn some money, right? You are willing to pay a dollar a pound for nutsedge removed, right? Starve the roots--roots will die if they do not get food from the tops by photosynthesis.
 
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zooba72

LawnSite Member
Location
New York
Thanks for the advice. I thought the Sedgehammer had worked but it came back strong. Will it eventually kill it if I continue to attack it ? I would prefer not to have to apply it every year. This is why I was thinking I would just use the glyphosphate which appears to have worked in the sections I sprayed (everything is dead), and then reseed the entire lawn in the fall.

I will also look into the other products you recommended - There is no doubt that Sedgehammer is works on the visible grass, but it seems like the nutlets are surviving and laying dormant for the next year.
 

Ckrasteria2

LawnSite Member
Location
Arkansas
Hi,
As others have said, keep at it and you'll eventually starve out those food-storing nutlets. I have a few small areas with nutsedge that I've been hand pulling with my favorite forked weed tool for the past 15 years, though it sounds like you have too much to hand pull. I find that it likes low areas, dense soil where moisture is very good. I have a similar problem with hairless common wood violet (viola sororia) that has a food storing rhizome - which I both love for its flowers and hate for how it shoots its seeds everywhere. Any weed with a bulb, corm, or rhizome usually takes repeated applications, repeated years of a proper herbicide to get it under control.
 

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