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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2 of my Bradford el sucko Pear trees lost a large limb on each from last nights wind. Both were the lowest limbs in the infamous Bradford crotch . THe wounds on both are into the center of the trunk. I doubt these trees will survive as they're now weakened more than than they can withstand given their crotch problems.
From what I've read over the years, spraying a pruning seal on new cuts is not recommended...but in this case, given the size of the wound would you recommend spraying it? thanks
 

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I recently completed a State accredited arborist class at a local college. Wound dressing is no longer recommended, but if you decide it is necessary, search for a 'Lac Compound (Balsm)' by a german company. I will try to get the name.
 

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Not to start an arguement, but it has been scientifically proven that wound dressings actually slow down the trees natural abilities to heal itself. There is a process called CODIT, which stands for Compartmentalization of Decay in Trees. This is a systematic process where the tree seals off the wound from the rest of the tree to halt infection/insects, then begins forming another bark layer. Unnatural dressings interfere with this process. The Lac Balsam mentioned above is made with natural ingredients, and I will have to do some research to get the name for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
knew I could count on you guys for some good info. I'll stay tuned b4 I spray anything. Right now I'm using the pole pruner(man that thing is such a good tool,..."chain saw on a stick"...goes thru the 3" limbs like butter....and I'm no where close to the action and since I'm a omplete wimp when it comes to chain saws this works for me...dont even own one and never will...soo many stories I hear from experienced guys who get bit by these things....and believe or not its on a split shaft trimmer from ECHO...yep ECHO...the brand some us love to hate...lol. Only lost one large lower limb on each tree but what concerns me is how deep the wound is.
 

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If you are really worried about it, what I would suggest doing is:

1) find any bark / wood that you can and tack it back in place to fill in the wound. (wood or bark should have come off from the tree causing the injury)
2) get some peat moss and get it nice and moist.
3) get some saran wrap, tape, and burlap or some kind of cloth fabric.
4) apply the wet peat moss to the injury
5) wrap with saran wrap nice and tight
6) seal with tape
7) cover saran wrap with burlap to keep light out.

Let that stay on for a couple of months. It will help the tree to close up the wound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
fb...I'll keep your bandage procedure in mind for the future since after my wife finally went outside and saw that at least a third of each tree is now bundled for the trashmen, she agrees they need to come down.(they were 13 years old and big) They look awful now and with their growth pattern, not much chance of them filling in the big gaps plus we dont want to rick they falling and damaging nearby pines and cars. THe person who developed Bradford Pears should be strung up by HIS pears...thanks for the help guys
 

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Here is a quote from this site.

"In February of 1998, our company began a study to compare the closure rate and the presence of fungi between wounds treated with our “Treekote” tree wound dressing and wounds left untreated. At this point in time, the study wounds are not old enough to be harvested and tested for the presence of harmful fungi. However, the study wounds that were treated with “Treekote” tree wound dressing showed significantly increased callus growth, an average of more than 25%, when compared to the untreated wounds."
 

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Originally posted by Team Gopher
Here is a quote from this site.

"In February of 1998, our company began a study to compare the closure rate and the presence of fungi between wounds treated with our “Treekote” tree wound dressing and wounds left untreated. At this point in time, the study wounds are not old enough to be harvested and tested for the presence of harmful fungi. However, the study wounds that were treated with “Treekote” tree wound dressing showed significantly increased callus growth, an average of more than 25%, when compared to the untreated wounds."
But Id be very skeptical about tests done using 'their' product, especially when they are a distributor. I will dig up some info from people who have no monetary gains at stake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Haven't planted one in many years so maybe I'm wrong but isn't the Aristocrat pear like the Cleveland? (better braching structure)I dont see them at the nursery so maybe I'm mistaken...yes my wife likes the big white blooms in spring and the red leaves in fall so the CLevelands will likely be put in..yep the damaged ones will come out ...just an accident waiting to happen now
 

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Originally posted by fblandscape
Gopher, I don't mean to sound like a ----... but can't you do anything else besides just cut and paste, and post links?
fblandscape, maybe you didnt intend on sounding like it, but that was extremely rude. Gopher is one of best contributors here. Nothing he offers is his opinion, always offers links and facts. UNLIKE other contributors here. Please give some thought to that. No disrespect intended to you, fblandscape-cuz I like ya, but gopher is appreciated for all of the help.

:)
 

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Did anyone ever hear of Dr. Alex Shigo? He did years of research for the U.S. Dept of Ag - Forestry Division this very issue. Ken H is right on the money.
 

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This subject just goes to show you how different arbory practices are across the US. Here in central Texas, every wound, from either trimming or naturally occurring, that is about 2" or larger, needs to be dressed. The Forest service has documented an increased vectoring of certain diseases that can be minimized by wound dressing.
 

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This is an old thread but I thought that I might add to it.
Here is what I was thinking in regard to decreasing wood decay at large wound sites. Apply a borate such as Timbor or Solubor, disodium octaborate tetrahydrate. Timbor is labeled a pesticide and mixes at 1lb per 1g of water. Applied to wood till runoff, wait 1/2 hr and apply again. If exposed to rain it should be sealed. Solubor is identical but is labelled AG, as a foliar source of boron. Read the label, it's the law. A good product to seal with is Doc Farwell's Grafting Seal or Seal & Heal. Both products are the same. Color is the difference. Yellow is used by a lot of grafters in OR. Green is used by a lot in CA. May be available in gray. Also have a white Tree Paint that may be identical. I have some green but would like to try the gray.
I spoke to Jeffrey Lloyd of Nisus and he indicated some problems with callous growth associated with contact to the borate. If sealed I would think that it wouldn't matter as it originates from meristem. My concern is with translocation and uptake by the living organism, the tree. Mr Lloyd suggested use of a "Knockdown Insecticide" in conjunction with quaternary ammonium compounds, no sealing of wound. The quaternary ammonium compound suggested is didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC).
More info : http://216.48.37.142/pubs/viewpub.jsp?index=7114
http://www.nisuscorp.com/brochure.asp
http://www.farwellproducts.peachhost.com/
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"Feet entangle birds, words...men"
 

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Personally, I use sealant foam. I have used it for some time with no adverse results and good ( fast) healing on larger wounds. I recently performed same for the infamous pear and minor corrective pruning and it's doing fine. Customer is very happy as these trees are mature and cannot be replaced, area has since been surrounded with sidewalks.
 
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