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Opinions on changing oil brands.

Ridin' Green

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Michigan
20W-50 isn't the recommended oil, but is allowable now and has been for 6 years. 10W-40 is the one they recommend in general-

file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/owner/My%20Documents/Downloads/Change%20Oil%20Viscosity%20For%20Air%20Cooled%20V-Twin%204%20Cycle%20Engine.pdf
 

JLH52

LawnSite Member
I agree, as long as you're changing it often enough and you're running proper weight, there's nothing much to worry about. I too have had many cars with 250k and 300k. I've run them with conventional and synthetic with no engine issues. Keep the oil maintenance on track and you won't have to worry. The nice thing about some of the synthetics is that you can stretch out the intervals which I do. I remember changing oil at 3500 miles, then I was doing it at 5k miles. Now, on every car I have owned for the past decade, they get 10k oil change intervals.
I currently have a 2005 Ford Freestyle SUV with 410,000 miles. I have used Amsoil 5w-20 synthetic since first oil change when car was new. I changed the oil every 25,000 miles which this oil is capable of. Still driving Freestyle daily.
 

Brucey

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Upstate NY
The main thing they seemed to be focused on with that Mobil 1 video discussing water cooled automobile engines, is fuel economy improvements from thinner weights.
 

fowvay

LawnSite Member
Location
Georgia
This is my first post on this forum and I realize I'm poking the hornets nest but I am a retired tribologist and I'd like to share just a small bit of knowledge regarding the use of multi-grade oils in air cooled OPE. There seems to be a misunderstanding in that a 5W-30 reacts to heat in the same manner that a mono-grade SAE 30 does. This is not the truth. When a multi-grade lubricant is created, the base fluid chosen is of a very low viscosity (ie: 4cSt). The oil is then blended with plasticizers and elastomers to get the light base oil to react at higher temperatures in a much different manner than would the base oil without the plasticizers. This is why you get fantastic cold flow characteristics in a multi-grade 5W-XX when compared to a mono-grade SAE 30. But what happens under extreme heat and stress is what we're concerned with. The plasticizers and elastomers will shear and burn off and ultimately render the multi-grade oil much lower viscosity than is needed for engine protection. This simply doesn't happen with mono-grade oils. I will post just a simple example that I reviewed from a common Valvoline mineral (non-synthetic) oil in viscosity grade 5W-30 and SAE 30. I hope it's readable and understandable - here goes: Kinematic viscosity @ 100ºc= 11.3 cSt multi/10.3 cSt mono. Kinematic viscosity at 40ºc: 70 cSt multi/87 cSt mono. Viscosity index: 154 multi/99 mono (due to the addition of viscosity index improvers in the multi). The multi-grade is lower density but the real kicker is the NOACK volatility: <15% loss for multi./ < 6% loss for mono. This information is directly from the product data sheet issued by Valvoline on August 17, 2020. If you're running an air cooled engine in high summer heat then it would be wise to stay away from anything 5W-xx. I personally don't even like 10W-XX but at least the starting base lubricant is sufficiently viscous to maintain an acceptable film strength over the course of time. Heaven forbid the 5W-30 engine has any sort of fuel dilution that will further reduce the film strength. OK, I apologize for this long and possibly incomprehensible thread but I hope I can add to future conversations. Thank you.
 

rippinryno

LawnSite Silver Member
Really appreciate the knowledge being shared fowvay. I tend to stick to the owners manual when it comes to oil recommendations and not youtube videos as we saw in this thread.

Again, thanks for sharing I'll definitely stick to my 10w40 or 20w50 when it comes to running these air cooled engines in the midwest here.
 

Shindaiwa_operator

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Paxton, NE
And the part that gets me is this- in water cooled car, SUV, pickup etc engines they give you one oil to use and we all use it, right? Sure I know there are all the different brands, but if my Toyota Avalon says I should use 0w-20 oil, then I promise you I’ll use 0w-20 oil and nothing else! Now, I understand we’re all discussing AIR cooled engines mostly in vtwin configuration on mowers. Not comparing apples if I bring up cars! BUT. I think it would be so nice to have 1 dedicated oil for engine, same as Toyota telling me to use 0w-20 in the example car above. Dumb complicated options are just always confusing, imo...
 

fowvay

LawnSite Member
Location
Georgia
Automobile manufacturers have to meet so many requirements mandated by the government that it truly is a different animal all together. The 0W-20/0W-16, and future 0W-8 lubricants are all driven by fuel economy requirements. The reduction of metallic anti-wear additives (ie: zddp, antimony) is driven by the vehicle manufacturers being required to warrant the emissions systems on the vehicles for 8 years and unlimited mileage. The engineering hurdles are huge but somehow they keep fulfilling the requirements.
 
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