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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All -

I’m trying to create a an updated organizational chart and staffing plan for next year. I have some newer employees who have expressed interest in stepping into new roles. I have created a somewhat optimistic org chart with roles that currently don’t have a need for anywhere near full-time. For example, we have a Marketing manager and an HR manager, etc. shown on our org chart.
I do have some very talented staff that I think could excel in these roles as secondary and tertiary responsibilities.

I’m working to put some hours estimates for each of these roles onto the org chart. So, for example, the HR role may be 25% of a full-time job throughout the year. The marketing role may be 25% of a FTE throughout the year (biased towards winter for planning and content creation )

I wonder if there are any industry ‘standards’ out there for such things. Like one designer supports 10 field employees in a design/ build division or similar. One Project Manager per three crews, etc.

I do realize this varies from business to business but knowing where we compare to others in the industry would be interesting.

For context, we are a smaller design/build firm focusing on mid/higher end landscape renovations.

Thanks !
 

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Hi All -

I’m trying to create a an updated organizational chart and staffing plan for next year. I have some newer employees who have expressed interest in stepping into new roles. I have created a somewhat optimistic org chart with roles that currently don’t have a need for anywhere near full-time. For example, we have a Marketing manager and an HR manager, etc. shown on our org chart.
I do have some very talented staff that I think could excel in these roles as secondary and tertiary responsibilities.

I’m working to put some hours estimates for each of these roles onto the org chart. So, for example, the HR role may be 25% of a full-time job throughout the year. The marketing role may be 25% of a FTE throughout the year (biased towards winter for planning and content creation )

I wonder if there are any industry ‘standards’ out there for such things. Like one designer supports 10 field employees in a design/ build division or similar. One Project Manager per three crews, etc.

I do realize this varies from business to business but knowing where we compare to others in the industry would be interesting.

For context, we are a smaller design/build firm focusing on mid/higher end landscape renovations.

Thanks !
Not that I have really seen

I think overall 6:1 to 9:1 of field staff to admin staff is what I have seen. Keep in mind Admin staff would include a mechanic, a person to answer phones, sales, design, someone to manage the crews themselves, Anyone who doesn’t preform work for a client.

also, I think I have seen 12-15% of revenue be administrative.

I suggest drawing up a chart that is 2x your present size/scale- clearly define responsibilities at that 2x level. Then shrink it down and shift responsibilities around so that all the hats are being worn. This will give you a path for next year but also be working towards a long term goal.
 

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Organizational Charts are great! It can show new employees the structure of the business, or organization. It also helps your current employees understand the “internal,” structure of the business. From your post, I can’t fully comprehend the purpose of your organizational chart, however.

Do you have clearly defined roles and expectations for each position? If not, determining the amount of hours that will be spent in each role may be difficult.

In my experience, the clearly defined roles and expectations (position), and overall Career Path, were determined before the org. charts.

If you don’t mind my asking, what’s your overall goal for your company’s org chart?
 

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Hi All -

I’m trying to create a an updated organizational chart and staffing plan for next year. I have some newer employees who have expressed interest in stepping into new roles. I have created a somewhat optimistic org chart with roles that currently don’t have a need for anywhere near full-time. For example, we have a Marketing manager and an HR manager, etc. shown on our org chart.
I do have some very talented staff that I think could excel in these roles as secondary and tertiary responsibilities.

I’m working to put some hours estimates for each of these roles onto the org chart. So, for example, the HR role may be 25% of a full-time job throughout the year. The marketing role may be 25% of a FTE throughout the year (biased towards winter for planning and content creation )

I wonder if there are any industry ‘standards’ out there for such things. Like one designer supports 10 field employees in a design/ build division or similar. One Project Manager per three crews, etc.

I do realize this varies from business to business but knowing where we compare to others in the industry would be interesting.

For context, we are a smaller design/build firm focusing on mid/higher end landscape renovations.

Thanks !
Jim Huston has a book with the info you're looking for - "Benchmarks for Landscape Construction Professionals"
 

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Hi All -

I’m trying to create a an updated organizational chart and staffing plan for next year. I have some newer employees who have expressed interest in stepping into new roles. I have created a somewhat optimistic org chart with roles that currently don’t have a need for anywhere near full-time. For example, we have a Marketing manager and an HR manager, etc. shown on our org chart.
I do have some very talented staff that I think could excel in these roles as secondary and tertiary responsibilities.

I’m working to put some hours estimates for each of these roles onto the org chart. So, for example, the HR role may be 25% of a full-time job throughout the year. The marketing role may be 25% of a FTE throughout the year (biased towards winter for planning and content creation )

I wonder if there are any industry ‘standards’ out there for such things. Like one designer supports 10 field employees in a design/ build division or similar. One Project Manager per three crews, etc.

I do realize this varies from business to business but knowing where we compare to others in the industry would be interesting.

For context, we are a smaller design/build firm focusing on mid/higher end landscape renovations.

Thanks !
There are no fixed rules that we know of. It all depends on the individual capability. The size and complexity of the project. You can plan for it but it needs to be flexible in case a change is needed. In our business, we mainly do maintenance and occasionally small design projects. These are the user types that we have House of Yards Help Center | What Are the Different Types of Users?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Organizational Charts are great! It can show new employees the structure of the business, or organization. It also helps your current employees understand the “internal,” structure of the business. From your post, I can’t fully comprehend the purpose of your organizational chart, however.

Do you have clearly defined roles and expectations for each position? If not, determining the amount of hours that will be spent in each role may be difficult.

In my experience, the clearly defined roles and expectations (position), and overall Career Path, were determined before the org. charts.

If you don’t mind my asking, what’s your overall goal for your company’s org chart?
Organizational Charts are great! It can show new employees the structure of the business, or organization. It also helps your current employees understand the “internal,” structure of the business. From your post, I can’t fully comprehend the purpose of your organizational chart, however.

Do you have clearly defined roles and expectations for each position? If not, determining the amount of hours that will be spent in each role may be difficult.

In my experience, the clearly defined roles and expectations (position), and overall Career Path, were determined before the org. charts.

If you don’t mind my asking, what’s your overall goal for your company’s org chart?
Thanks : ). Good question regarding our purpose in creating the org chart.

The main reason was to understand how to divide responsibility for managing different divisions and to understand the structure in each - then plug in employees into each job/ role.

We have detailed job descriptions for each role/ job that include measurable objectives and detailed directions for each aspect of the role.

it has been helpful in creating development plans for employees and general planning.

I’ve realized that most problems in our business stem from me not having the time to do everything possible to support staff and make everything else work. I’m trying to spend a portion of the winter making training of all roles more easy and therefore more easy to hand off.
 

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Sounds like you are nearing a pivotal point of a stand alone company managed by one or two, to a structured hierarchy managed by divisions. Which of course is a huge leap. The employee's you are interested in handling more/ different responsibilities- Unless you are ready for a large scale switch, Just casually bring it up/ incorporate it into their daily work load.. It doesn't need to be a fly by switch, they should ease into that position. With that, give em a small bump in pay and help them along the way until it's a full scale position. Last week, I tried to recruit someone I thought was awesome into our company of a different type of work from someone's title ' Regional Warranty landscape manager' I'm bummed I didn't steal him, sign of a good company though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Mitchgo.- I appreciate the insight. I think part of my reason for asking for industry standards for percentage of staff in each role is to better set some boundaries for what employees could/should spend time wise learning and then occupying a role. I realize there will be a learning curve and am trying to implement these changes now so we can practice and learn over the winter when things are less hectic for me and I can offer more support.

I do feel that one employee who has been in a more management level position is not being pushed enough to take on a reasonable workload for a full time position BUT I’m trying to balance this feeing with her being new to the company, A new grad, and the fact that not all of our systems are as pinned down/ linear as they should be for her to effectively manage some of our leads and design projects. I’ve run a lot of things by intuition over the years and trying to train a young designer (who likes to follow rules) is a bit challenging. We have rules but I feel that a design process is hard to always be linear within. Sometimes the design just jumps out at you and sometimes it’s a slog.

If she’s going to excel in the role longer term I really need to work with her consistently and create the right tools/ processes/ understanding for things….. so, now I’m doing a large portion of what I hope she will do in the future. Therefore, I need to have her help in other ways.

So, I’m trying to

1) set a realistic goal for future - perhaps that one designer can design and sell $x annually ( perhaps backed up by some industry standard )

2) acknowledged that she’s training and this may take a while. ( so her goal this season may be $500k with 4 hours of my time weekly

3) identify a fair workload in other areas if the role isn’t full time.

Having some mathematical way to justify things and set goals and benchmark against in the future seems wise.
 

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@JEJ

I hope that the creation, and implementation, of your organizational chart will help to alleviate much of your “need,” to do everything, and ideally help you delegate more of your company’s responsibilities!

The last in-house position I had, one of the biggest overall projects we had was setting up systems and processes. It helps the business to run in a way that isn’t dependent upon any one individual (even including the owner).

Not sure of your training model, materials, or process(es), but I can say as a millennial…trying to work in, or for, a business which doesn’t have proper systems in place can be very challenging. I commend you for your efforts, sir! It’s always nice to see business owners working on their business models in order to create a better atmosphere for the whole company!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I didn’t catch that. Very true. A designer should do 2million per year I think ? A basic manager for maintenance can handle 1 million.
Thanks - this is along the lines of what I’m thinking for goal setting purposes with this employee - let’s say after a training period we would expect 1.5M in sales for a designer. However, we are a smaller company and likely shooting for $750k in total sales next year. That said, the designer role should be 50% of a full time and she should be able to fulfill some other roles within the company beyond the design end of things.

The big challenge to me is she’s really great with the soft skills and is asking for a relatively low pay rate…. I just don’t see her really ever driving sales though or being an all-star. I do feel lucky to have her on board but at the same time always wishing she was more self-sufficient and could drive things a bit. Perhaps it takes a bit more time to be comfortable and getting some of our sales / marketing a bit better tuned up and this will give her the confidence to excel a bit. In the short term, setting some goals based on “reasonable” industry standards to motivate things forward makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Without knowing the revenue of your business, sounds like you may need to hire an industry specific consultant?
500k sales from a designer are low numbers.
Thanks - we’re shooting for about $750 k in sales next year. Part of my goal here is to say something along the lines of, “ we have a 50% position for a designer, what else can you be doing.? Taking all phone calls and managing new leads may be a 25% of FTE role and maybe 25% helping with horticultural tasks” Something to set expectations a bit more now that she’s been here 9 months. I don’t want her to think that she should settle just because I didn’t push her too hard during her first nine months.

This may be a factor too- we do charge for design services. So perhaps her design role may be lumped in with production rather than admin in a way
 

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Have you looked at a functional org chart example? Where you put the roles needed to run the business in the boxes before adding any people. Because some roles may be fractional, the same name may be in more then one box when you’re done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Have you looked at a functional org chart example? Where you put the roles needed to run the business in the boxes before adding any people. Because some roles may be fractional, the same name may be in more then one box when you’re done.
Thanks - yes - this is what we’re doing. The thing I’m struggling with is trying to understand how much of a full time role each position should be. I’m not too concerned with meeting industry standards but knowing generally the range of how similar design/build firms work os the goal. I appreciated the reminder on Jim Huston as a resource.

I hope you have a great turkey day. Based on your name I assume you are in Omaha. That zoo is really something amazing…. Stopped by for the day on the way back from Colorado Ski trip last spring.
 
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