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planted a bunch of bare root trees in one spot, now what?!

Discussion in 'Nurseries and Growers' started by Brian Schreiber, Jun 2, 2020.

  1. Brian Schreiber

    Brian Schreiber LawnSite Member
    Messages: 20

    I live on 80 ac with a bunch of deer always after anything my wife and I plant. We bought over a 100 small bare roots and planted most of them in a fenced in area as a temporary repository until we had time to disburse them around the property. This prevents the deer from pulling them up in the meantime.

    The bare roots consist of: Maple trees, Saskatoon service berries, plum, and tamaracks. In addition our woods are inundated with red oaks that are being taking out en masse by oak wilt. However, some of the oak trees are WHITE oaks and appear to not have much problem, more resistant?, to the oak wilt. There are hundreds of these white oaks sprouting from acorns and, man, they have deep tap roots already.

    My goal is to pull up all the fenced in bare roots planted 12 to 18" apart and move them out to the woods or a field, 5 to 10 at a time. I don't want to wait too long while their tap roots(if they have them like the Oaks!) dig deeper preventing removal without tearing up the tap root. Additionally, I would like to figure out if it is possible / reasonable to let the oaks run until next spring and THEN pull them in the least damaging way for replanting as bare roots.

    So, 2 questions: For the white oaks: What tool / process is best to use to remove them for bare root planting?

    For the fenced bushes and trees: Would all of those species be OK to leave in the fenced area for a year or two? or should I really move on them by this Fall, say, and get them replanted?

    Thanks!
    NOTE: transplanting a bunch of the white oaks this spring I found many with roots over a foot deep already, acorn still attached. I used a spade and dug that deep to get them out.
     
    Crazy 4 grass likes this.
  2. Crazy 4 grass

    Crazy 4 grass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,207

    I too live on acreage with heavy deer pressure.

    2 years ago I bought a hundred or so bare root trees and planted them all over the place. I have had no end of trouble keeping the deer away from them. Liquid Fence is somewhat effective but it wears off. Caging them is effective but time-consuming and an eyesore. This spring I decided to stop fighting a losing battle. I bought 20 5 gallon buckets and filled them most of the way up with black dirt. Then I dug down approximately 12in and 12 in diameter. I removed the root ball and tree and put them in the five gallon buckets. I then transported them into my garden which is surrounded by a deer-proof fence. My plan is to grow them in the buckets until they are 6ft tall or so and then transplant them back into the yard.

    After two years I found that most of the trees Taproot was more than 12 in below the surface. I carefully pulled out the root ball found the Taproot and then pulled on that and was able to extract it intact.
    My trees are white oak and red Maples.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Brian Schreiber

    Brian Schreiber LawnSite Member
    Messages: 20

    Hey that is a good idea. . . not sure it is quite what I am looking for but points out the importance of stopping the tap root with a barrier. Maybe it would work dig a 2 ft deep trench with rain gutter in the bottom and two sloping plastic panels (each side) directing roots into the gutter-- about 18" x length of gutter. Basically, make a long narrow containment for roots channeling them toward the gutter at the base. Then, place the bare root trees in the mostly filled trench and fill with dirt. Maybe that would allow easier removal 2 to 6? years out without having to worry about the tap root anchor! I think even the barrier cloth used under landscaping rock would not be tough enough to prevent the tap root from "tapping" through it. Needs to be a hard barrier-- like bottom of the 5 gal buckets.
     
    Crazy 4 grass likes this.
  4. Crazy 4 grass

    Crazy 4 grass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,207

    Yes I think that idea could certainly work.

    I went with the 5-gallon bucket idea because when the time comes to move them all of the roots will be contained. I will not have to dig them up. My idea is loosely following what you might see trees come in at Home Depot or something like that.
     
  5. Crazy 4 grass

    Crazy 4 grass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,207

    If it is looks that are a concern you could sit early dig a 18 inch deep Trench and then line up a bunch of buckets in the trench. Bury them so that the tops are slightly below ground level. That way any when it comes time to move them you could just pull each one out in the bucket.
     
  6. Crazy 4 grass

    Crazy 4 grass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,207

    I had not noticed it initially but I see you are from Elk River I live in Princeton
     
  7. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,211

    Deer cause so many problems. Where i live you can't grow hardly anything. Young tree's are just about doomed. The deer are so aggressive that they will do everything they can to get through a cage for 1 bite of a green leaf. Vegetable gardens are a lost cause unless you put a 8 foot high fence around them.

    Those hot pepper juice sprays work until it rains. But respraying isn't really practical. The only thing that seems to have SOME success is the anti-deer water sprinkler but unless you have a water supply that's not really practical either.

    All i know is that if i move again checking the deer population will be one of my first priority's.
     
    Crazy 4 grass likes this.
  8. Crazy 4 grass

    Crazy 4 grass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,207

    I've counted 22 deer in my yard at one time before ugh. Anyways my vegetable garden is about a quarter acre. Due to cost, I put an electric fence around it a couple years ago. 8ft tall. Wires Wires spaced about every 12 inches. Keeps 95 % of the deer out.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Brian Schreiber

    Brian Schreiber LawnSite Member
    Messages: 20

    Holy crapp! only 95% of them?! SOME got through that?! Ha. I am dying. These dang deer. I only have a six ft fence on our garden and am now starting to worry about having the whole herd in there! Maybe I should run a "hot" top wire!
     
    Crazy 4 grass likes this.
  10. OP
    OP
    Brian Schreiber

    Brian Schreiber LawnSite Member
    Messages: 20

    In Oakdale,MN suburb where we lived until 3 yrs ago, my wife watched as deer 30 ft from her kitchen window pulled up new plantings right in front of her one morning. That is a funny image in my mind. . . and HER running our there after that doe! I think I will put up one of my trail cams and see what is happening at night near the 6 ft fence. . .
     
    hort101 and Crazy 4 grass like this.

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