Pole saw hopping out of the cut on smaller branches?

Discussion in 'Tree Climbing, Pruning, Felling' started by Ready to Mow, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. Ready to Mow

    Ready to Mow LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,042

    I noticed on smaller 1.5''-2" diameter branches that flex fairly easy that the saw just keeps bouncing out of the cut. I ended up having to get up on a ladder and just use a regular chainsaw. Anyone else have this problem? Even when I press down more it still does it although not as bad.
     
  2. RDALawns

    RDALawns LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from Texas
    Messages: 1,640

    Are you running a anti kickback chain on it? That will cause it on smaller limbs. Screenshot_2017-01-13-22-08-16.png Screenshot_2017-01-13-22-08-16.png Screenshot_2017-01-13-22-05-24.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2017
  3. OP
    OP
    Ready to Mow

    Ready to Mow LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,042

    Didn't know their was such a thing. I'm running the chain that came with it. It's an echo ppt-266.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Ready to Mow

    Ready to Mow LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,042

    I'll look tomorrow and see if it has that extra little hook.
     
  5. RDALawns

    RDALawns LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from Texas
    Messages: 1,640

    There is a difference the anti kick chain has a drag between the cutting link. Its safer on larger stuff and typically what they put on them when the sell them.I run this chain on my pole saw. It works fine just have to be more careful. Screenshot_2017-01-13-22-08-16.png
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Ready to Mow

    Ready to Mow LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,042

    I looked at a picture at the home depot website of what I have and it actually lets you zoom in on the chain to get a good look. It looks like every other link has a cutting link and in between is just a standard link that doesn't do any cutting. What kind of chain is that? It doesn't match your pictures.
     
  7. larryinalabama

    larryinalabama LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 20,412

    Tell us more about that chain we need????
     
  8. RDALawns

    RDALawns LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from Texas
    Messages: 1,640

    I looked as well. Its appears to be a standard side chisel chain. Have you sharpened the chain? The leading chain gage could be longer than the cutting tooth. That would cause it to do that too.
     
  9. RDALawns

    RDALawns LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from Texas
    Messages: 1,640

    I copied this from forestry app


    Ah, those little guys on the front of the saw chain tooth. With only a little swipe of the file, I can make this chain saw really cut!

    Some call them Rakers, some call them Drags, others, like I do, refer to them as Depth Gauges. Whatever you technically want to call them. Some people abuse them, some confuse them, and some just don’t realize how they work and what they do for you.

    I often hear, "they are to be left alone". "Don’t mess with them." Others say to, "take them down first thing on a new chain." Most common exchange of thought is, "you really don’t have to do anything with them. They will wear down as you use the chain."

    In answer, first I would recommend… if you don’t understand them leave them alone but, take them and the rest of the chain, to a professional shop for sharpening and depth gauge settings.

    You have to adjust them. Look at the chain tooth. The top plate area, as you file it back, goes downward toward the end of the top plate. As you file the cutting surface of the tooth back, the depth gauge will grow. Maybe not grow, but stick up past the tooth point. The results, you will either have to set them properly or you will have to apply so much pressure to the saw to get it to cut, it will be dangerous for the saw, saw chain, guide bar and You.

    Taking the depth gauges down on a new chain or at any point of the chain life, below manufacturer’s specs is not a good idea. Check the specifications on your saw chain and make sure you use proper tools to maintain the settings as close as possible. With hand tools it’s hard to keep everything perfect, but dropping them too much below design can mean a lot of grabbing, chatter and possibly loss of control.

    Well, finally the last statement is somewhat true. They will possibly wear down a little on their own in abrasive conditions. Nevertheless, under normal cutting of wood, not rocks, etc., the hardened surface of the depth gauge is not likely to wear very much. At least not wear to the tune of an exact thousands of an inch.

    Proper Depth Gauge checks and adjustments during the filing/sharpening process are as important as having two-cycle oil in your fuel mix. You can cause a lot of damage taking them for granted.

    Screenshot_2017-01-13-22-50-41.png
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Ready to Mow

    Ready to Mow LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,042

    It's only been used on one job, so I would hardly think it's worn out. My apologies, but all your technical terms are way over my head. Is there a better chain for this machine that you could recommend for smaller branches that would work well? Thanks.
     

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