Pond cleaning,what to charge

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by BlazingRakes, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. BlazingRakes

    BlazingRakes LawnSite Member
    Male, from VT
    Messages: 18

    Wasn't thinking that day, meet with him at the end of a hard day. Should of took some pictures. Will try to get some soon.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  2. Darryl G

    Darryl G Inactive
    Messages: 9,500

    Does this pond have a liner? It sounds awful big to be a lined pond.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  3. Grassfire205

    Grassfire205 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 92

    A leaf vacuum system? I can rent one around here. Something to look into

    vacuum+hose,+ll2_l.jpg
     
  4. monster967

    monster967 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 16

    I think you're going about this the wrong way. We clean around 400 ponds every year. The bottom of the pond is likely to still be wet, meaning blowing the leaves is out of the question. You will need to rake the loose debris and haul it out. Now the real trick about cleaning ponds is how to get all the sludge and muck out of the bottom. It's likely this pond hasn't been cleaned in a long time so over the years all those leaves sitting in there decompose and turn in to sludge, just like a lake or swamp. You will need a decent size pump and a long pipe to dilute the sludge and pump it out. If there is more than 6'' of sludge on the bottom we rent a trailer mounted vacuum to suck it out 500 gallons at a time. Then we power wash the whole thing to remove built up algae, etc. You can take the shortcut and leave the sludge in but it will be harder to maintain and keep cleaner in the future. Also, if the homeowner is paying someone to clean the pond, they will probably not be happy if they can still see muck in the pond now that there will be clear water. I need some photos to be sure but I would probably charge closer to 2k. That price takes in to consideration that we are very efficient and quick. First timers have a hard time with this. If they really only want the leaves removed and not have the actual pond cleaned well, that's up to you.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  5. BlazingRakes

    BlazingRakes LawnSite Member
    Male, from VT
    Messages: 18

    No liner
     
  6. BlazingRakes

    BlazingRakes LawnSite Member
    Male, from VT
    Messages: 18

    Thank you for your reply. Very insightful. I'm going to go back and take another look at it, and double check my idea of what it will take to do the job and make certain what the customer is looking for as a finished project.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  7. Plantguyjoe

    Plantguyjoe LawnSite Member
    Messages: 1

    Just my opinion on this, but go with your hourly rate plus about 25%, and bid it high. Not ludicrous high, but definitely worth the time it's going to take to do the job well. You can always get an industrial tarp, attach ropes to it and hook them parachute style to the hitch of your truck, and drag the majority of the leaves out....muck etc. as well...pull it right over to the dump site and dump it all. the sump pump and dilution with a power washer will come into play at the bottom, where the leftover muck and debris is. Def. take some before and after pics, as this could lead to a service you offer in spring or early fall.
     

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