Proper spraying technique

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by CSR, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,008

    I wrote a great spraying paragraph --but posting time expired. Gone. But maybe a draft was saved--if so--where?
    To summarize hold the loop to relieve strain on your wrist. It will be more stiff in cold weather--need bigger loop.
    Pull the hose to the farthest corner of the lot first. Spray east and west on the way back. Alternate right turns with left turns.
    Look behind you frequently; keep the hose lying flat. Never more than one loop. Never step over the hose--this causes a twist--unless you step over to correct a twist.
    A sprayer with years of experience will never twist the hose and his reel always winds up neatly.

    It is Ok to use a tree as a pulley to go around a corner--but make sure it is strong--at least 4 inches diameter.

    Make a glove protector to guide the hose when winding it to the reel. Cut a plastic oil can or gallon jug in half. Allowing the hose to go through the spout of the bottle--which is cut in half.
     
    kemco, CSR and bmc1025 like this.
  2. OP
    OP
    CSR

    CSR LawnSite Member
    from AB
    Messages: 46

    Good insights and wisdom. I’ll be trying that! I’ve noticed the twisting of the hose and loops is one of the biggest frustrations! And I wish I purchased a reel guide now but owell. I can add it later.

    Another question. Have you ever seen a lawn a couple weeks later and realized an area was missed? Is it pretty easy to remedy by spraying just that area again?

    And it does save a draft...not sure where? I just know because since been typing it’s told me “draft saved.”
     
  3. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,008

    Do not guide the hose with your glove--because if your glove happens to catch on the hose, it could yank your arm. If you don't release the button immediately it could wrap your arm around the reel and break your arm.
     
  4. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,008

    [​IMG]
    OK here is a pic from the top of this website. I am sure he thinks it is correct according to his training. But I disagree--I think he may have learned this at Chemlawn. The loop to reduce wrist strain is behind his back. This is a problem because the back of your shirt gets really dirty from contact with the hose and the solution.
    I should point out that properly done, the left hand holds a loop to relieve wrist strain from a stiff hose. However, the gun must be rotated so that the natural curl of the hose curls upward. Loosen the hose clamp--rotate and then tighten firmly. Do not pull on the gun--sometimes the gun detaches from the hose.
    Maybe someone has a photo or video.

    And then cover the hose clamp with black tape to protect your hands from being scratched by the sharp edges of the screw clamp.

    Once you get the hang of it, you should be able--with the left hand--to smoothly shift the hose to the over-the-shoulder position. This allowing you to use your shoulder to pull the hose when there is a long length behind you. Photo needed.
     
    CSR likes this.
  5. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,008

    Here is a a video with the strain relief coil held in front like I think it should be. For instance at 25 seconds. But I use a bigger, more upward coil.

    And I would never use a manual wind-up reel.

    When he switches to a pistol grip gun for insecticide on bushes, the hose comes out the bottom of the grip. Different direction. I have never used that type.

    I guess you have to curl the hose around to suit your day's temperature and hose stiffness.

    Wearing gloves--good. And both of these guys should be wearing rubber boots, as called for on the label. Required in most states. At least they are wearing eye protection. However they should be wearing a hat for sun protection.

     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
    CSR likes this.
  6. OP
    OP
    CSR

    CSR LawnSite Member
    from AB
    Messages: 46

     
  7. OP
    OP
    CSR

    CSR LawnSite Member
    from AB
    Messages: 46

    Sorry, my last post didn't format like I thought. Can't delete it...

    I keep the hose in front with the loop. One difference for me is I have the gregson clark dual hose chemlawn gun, which I've modded to my liking a bit. So I actually have a dual 3/8" hose coming off the gun which can be extra annoying when keeping it from coiling up. I've been managing though. Over the shoulder is a good idea for strength. Never thought of that.

    And I was sure to get an electric hose reel! No way I'm manually reeling that hose each time! I used to with a single 3/8" that was only 150' long and it wasn't bad, but still annoying.

    One thing I noticed in the video is his motion when spraying. He doesn't move it side-to-side much. I feel like that application would result in less even coverage? Maybe I'm overthinking it but when I'm spraying I'm waving it pretty quick to get as even coverage as possible. But this guys was barely moving it back and forth. Is that typical?

    View attachment 380351
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2019
    Point40acresandadeere likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    CSR

    CSR LawnSite Member
    from AB
    Messages: 46

    I have another question but this time about my actually spray product. I use 12-0-0 from Lesco, and also add in a fert that has 13-10-5-0.1Zn-0.05Mn-0.05Cu-0.05B-0.1Fe + BA. The 12 iron is slow release, the other fert is not. I mix these two so I get a higher N, the other macros, and some more micros, as 12 iron lacks at least in the P and K. Do you think this is a reasonable mixture or should I avoid anything that's not slow release? Is the 12 iron enough N for you guys? Or is the fact it has iron to green it up enough to not care? When I was doing granular I was putting down a 20 N most of the time if not higher.

    The 12 iron label suggests 3-4 applications per year at 2-3 gallons of concentrate per acre. If I'm doing 5 applications per year, should I reduce the amount I'm putting down each time? So instead of 2.5 gal/acre, for example, would I do 1.75-2 gal/acre? Is there any downside to just keeping it at the 2.5? It would cost more but I want enough down each time as well.

    Screen Shot 2019-05-11 at 10.33.28 PM.png
     
    Point40acresandadeere likes this.
  9. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,008

    Good point--however I think a slow movement back and forth is fine. Remember you are moving forward at the same time. When its hot I used to apply with one motion of my hand for each step forward.
    Mr Lawn Ranger looks to be wearing leather gloves--should be rubber gloves.

    I really dislike the spray technique I have seen turgren using. Looks like a wimpy rapid wrist flicking motion to me. Maybe it is supposed to look like they are actually doing something. I think a close look would show that they have very low pressure and very low gallons per thousand. Which probably means a very low fertilizer rate.

    I think the rate of 12-0-0 is very low. If it weighs 10 pounds per gallon--at 12 percent nitrogen that is 1.2 lbs N per gallon. At 2 to 3 gallons per acre that would be 2.4 to 3.6 pounds nitrogen per acre. Not much.

    Iron to "green it up"--may not work unless iron is deficient--or the soil is alkaline. If you read carefully on the label of an iron product--it will probably say to apply something like 6 ounces per thousand sqft. Probably way more than you are applying. This is far in excess of the actual need, but the iron turns black and this darkens the color. Opinions vary. Experienced guys chime in...

    Nitrogen is usually recommended at about a pound per thousand--but you need to lower the nitrogen rate to avoid fertilizer burn, particularly if you are using less than 3 gallons of solution per thousand sqft. More so if the temperature is over 80 F.

    Opinions vary. Experience counts.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2019
    Delmarva Keith likes this.
  10. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,008

    Here is the cover of a magazine from April. It shows the spraying technique that I think works out the best. He is holding a loop of hose to prevent tension on the wrist from the hose stiffness. The hose is lying flat behind him.
    Eye protection good--sunglasses a good idea. Of course, he should have a hat for sun protection and rubber boots.
    A broad brim hat offers more skin protection. Reduces the chance of lesions on the ears from the sun.

    SA400001 (2).JPG
     

Share This Page