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Protecting Apple tree grafts from deer

Discussion in 'Fertilizers, Pesticides and Diseases' started by RAlmaroad, Mar 17, 2016.

  1. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Messages: 203

    Well the old thread got resurrected. Here are some updated pics of what is going on. I planted 270 more this year, Honeycrisp, Firestorm Honeycrisp, Wolf River, Zestar, Granny Smith and 10 crab apples (for pollinators. They are doing well but didn't grow as fast as the first year. I had a consultant look at them two weeks ago. I need to start with growth regulators next year and phosphorous and potash according to soil tests. Haven't done tissue testing yet.

    These first pics are 17 month old trees.

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    These are this years trees:

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    RussellB and hort101 like this.
  2. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Messages: 2,253

    Those make my heart leap!!! Just wonderful. I'm so happy for you. We had a tremendous growing season. My 50 are doing well also, but nothing like those. Thanks for sharing.
     
    Yatt and hort101 like this.
  3. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Messages: 203

    Well next Spring 140 Premier Honeycrisp are going in then I'll probably call it quits................:rolleyes:

    I wanted to get the end post bracing in before the ground freezes. But the fencing company I get my posts from has not come through.:hammerhead::angry:

    You just can't get 12' round posts just anywhere. Getting them in now is just one fewer thing I need to do in the Spring.:weightlifter:
     
    hort101 likes this.
  4. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Messages: 2,253

    I saw those in Italy this past May. There was a top huge cable strung along the whole row and anchored with those huge deep twist type anchors. the line was tighten from a lightpole or bigger. So impressive. There were miles and miles of orchards as far as you could see on the Po Valley from outside Bologna all the way to Ravenna. There were growing oranges, lemons, apples, pears, and some others that I could not recognize. What a impressive sight. Yours are of the same quality or better and just as impressive!!!
     
    hort101 and Yatt like this.
  5. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Messages: 203

    It's kind of funny that I have now spent the last 6 years or so making fence. First I built high tensile fencing with 9" spacing round the first trees. The deer went through it like nothing. Then I added poultry wire to that and it did keep the deer out but it looked terrible and was starting to rust.

    The I salvaged 1100' of 8' deer fencing from a deer farm. Had to dig up and move it here and reinstall. I put all the posts for the fence and trellis in by hand with a Seymore post haul auger. Works great BTW.
    https://www.google.com/shopping/pro...MIksuyqZLY1wIVEI5-Ch2-MwtxEAQYASABEgIEyPD_BwE

    The trellis end anchor posts are very important. They must be extremely strong to support the tension of the high tensile wire and wind load that the trees will exert if there are storms. The end posts taper from 6-8" and are 42" in the ground. They are kind of like mini telephone poles.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  6. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Messages: 2,253

    Should I be younger, I'd be all over that type of growing. But alas; time has taken a toll but hopefully I'll get to see a bumper crop. It's a shame that youth is often wasted and wisdom only grows when life's time is shortened.
     
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  7. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Messages: 203

    I didn't start this project until I retired. My wife reminds me "what are you going to do with the orchard when you get old". Well one has to do what they enjoy and having purpose everyday keeps one going. You can't retire and just sit back and relax if you plan on having a healthy retirement.

    Sometimes I have to get after myself to do an orchard task, but once I get in the orchard it is a peaceful thing to do and time goes by fast and there is always something to do.

    For example recently I spent an half hour per posts pulling down the morning glories I planted on the end bracing. The other day spent an hour putting down an rodenticide in vole holes and rebating the bait stations. Right now I am searching for some 12' anchor posts for end bracing and want them installed before the ground freezes.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  8. RussellB

    RussellB LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 8,535

    Great thread. :clapping::clapping:
     
    hort101 and Yatt like this.
  9. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Messages: 203

    Sorry things have changed direction a little, (or a lot) but I thought some might find this interesting.
     
    hort101 and RussellB like this.
  10. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Messages: 2,253

    You are so right. I've got so much to do that I would have to outlive Moses in order to get it all done. Getting up and taking care of lawn, finishing up carving projects, furniture, repairing work for 1790 restoration project in my area and the list goes on and on. My little orchard gives me the same feeling working in it as the sun rise casts golden sun on the trees and shadows are long with a few ducks landing on the pond. These are things that only appeal to true keepers of the earth can enjoy. These are the things that add days to a life well lived.
     
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