Question regarding Hunter rotor nozzle sizes and caring for my well instead of cycle stop valve

clydesdale

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
carmel, ny
I know the season is almost over, but I just overseeded and I am now using my irrigation more than I did all year. We got plenty of rain this year. My question is, do I adjust the nozzle sizes to keep the well pump on continuously and should I eliminate pauses between zones so that the pump never shuts off. I have 12 zones. I wanted a cycle stop valve. But, wrong pump choice wrecked that. Valve man confirmed that.
My pressure switch is a 40/65. When the pump is triggered at 40, it ends up only building to about 47 during my 20 minute run time on a typical zone. The pump never shuts off. When the zone shuts off, it takes 51 seconds to go from 47 psi to when it stops at 65psi. I would then have about another 4 minutes before the next zone kicks in. What is best for the pump? Ditch the pause between zones and just have the pump stay on? This zone that I am referring to flowed 217 gallons in the 20 minutes. Should I change the nozzles on a few zones that only flow about 160 gallons so that they too keep running? Thanks
 

Wet_Boots

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
metro NYC
Why change anything? You have a rest period between zones, and that protects the pump. If you eliminate the rest period, you might have two zones open at once, which might drop the pressure enough to make zones stick open.

Is this a deep-well submersible pump?
 
OP
C

clydesdale

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
carmel, ny
Yes. It is down 300 feet. I was thinking of eliminating the rest so that the pump would not shut off in between cycles. My thought was that it takes about 50 seconds for the pump to catch up, once the zone shuts off. So, why not have the next zone kick on during that 50 seconds, so the pump never really catches up and just keeps running. Bad idea? Thanks.
 
OP
C

clydesdale

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
carmel, ny
With the zones that are tuned properly, the pump does not cycle while running the zone. My plan is to increase some nozzle sizes in some other zones so the pump does not cycle in the zones either.
 

Wet_Boots

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
metro NYC
I don't think they give out a Major Award for least amount of pump starts in a watering period. If your zones can operate on a one-at-a-time basis with a steady output, then mission accomplished. If any individual zone is failing to consume enough water to prevent cycling, then remedy that particular zone.

In more primitive times, without multiple nozzle output sizes as standard equipment on rotor heads, cycling prevention was often more about pressure switch tweaking. The standard Square-D pressure switch could be set for a 70 psi cutoff, with the idea that the pump would output less flow at higher pressures, putting a balance point within reach. Since pressure tanks were often rated only to 75 psi, it wasn't too bothersome that the Square-D switch could not go much higher than that 70 psi cutoff.

50inchcrate_900x.jpg
 
OP
C

clydesdale

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
carmel, ny
I get what you are saying. But, my understanding was that the pump could run all day and be happy. It is the starts that where down life expectancy. If that is true, couldn't simply reduce the time between zones to 30 seconds or so and that would likely keep it running. But, yes, I am happy that I have at least been able to tweak it so that the pump stays on for the whole time the zone is on. Thanks.
 

Optimal Irrigation Corp.

LawnSite Member
Location
Ontario
I don't think they give out a Major Award for least amount of pump starts in a watering period. If your zones can operate on a one-at-a-time basis with a steady output, then mission accomplished. If any individual zone is failing to consume enough water to prevent cycling, then remedy that particular zone.

In more primitive times, without multiple nozzle output sizes as standard equipment on rotor heads, cycling prevention was often more about pressure switch tweaking. The standard Square-D pressure switch could be set for a 70 psi cutoff, with the idea that the pump would output less flow at higher pressures, putting a balance point within reach. Since pressure tanks were often rated only to 75 psi, it wasn't too bothersome that the Square-D switch could not go much higher than that 70 psi cutoff.

50inchcrate_900x.jpg
Fragile.... must be Italian
 

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