Rapelling for those high, steep roofs

Discussion in 'Christmas Trees & Seasonal' started by Stuttering Stan, Nov 25, 2014.

  1. Stuttering Stan

    Stuttering Stan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,504

    How many here actually use ropes and work from the shingles on those high rooflines? I am frustrated with moving ladders or not being able to reach those high points. From a production standpoint, it is worth the increased danger to work from the roof? If so, what equipment do you have (carabiners, kernmantle rope, class II harness, etc), what anchor points do you use.
    I have mixed thoughts on the increased danger vs. being able to tackle those high rooflines.
     
  2. recycledsole

    recycledsole LawnSite Gold Member
    from MD
    Messages: 3,306

    I also would like to know the anchor point.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Stuttering Stan

    Stuttering Stan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,504

    For anchor points, I would guess a chimney as the first point and something on the rear of the house (tree, deck) as a secondary anchor. But, I do have concerns about rope abrasions when crossing the peak, gutters, etc.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  4. GreenI.A.

    GreenI.A. LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,130

    Rope abrasion isn't much of a concern. Arborist have their ropes pulling back and forth over rough branches all the time. When working on a roof your using a single rope technique, so your line isn't constantly sliding back and forth. It would be very similar to how roofing companies tie in. The rope usually hangs off the other side of the house and is anchored to a large tree or truck. Obviously you have to know the angles so that the rope going off the opposite side doesn't damage the gutter. You also have to know the amount of lateral side-to-side moving you can do be fire you risk the rope sliding along the ridge line on you. You also have to take precautions so that a employee doesn't absentmindedly jump in to the truck your using as an anchor. Most states do not alow roofers to use the chimney as an anchor, this may also be Oshawa I'm not sure. OSHA has specific classes and certification for tieing in on roofs for construction/roofing. I would assume they would be applicable to lighting as well.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  5. whiffyspark

    whiffyspark LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,014

    Use a roof pipe anchor. They usually go in the exhaust pipe
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  6. Ditta&Sons

    Ditta&Sons LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,491



    :help::help::help:
     
  7. Ducke

    Ducke LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 353

    Portable tow behind man lift is the safest option and they don't cost much I get one for $275.00 a day or $750.00 for the week.
     
  8. whiffyspark

    whiffyspark LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,014

    Those lifts are disasters waiting to happen. Hardly close to the safest option
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Stuttering Stan

    Stuttering Stan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,504

    Thanks for the replys regarding anchor points and rope. IMO, a man lift is not a sensible option due to intricate landscapes around residences which can restrict access. I think working from from the shingles make the most sense from an efficiency standpoint but all the most dangerous.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,059

    I'm the crazy one who goes to impossible to get places. Dormers on metal roofs and things like that. I grab the fins on the metal roof and up I go like Spiderman. I did buy a construction type harness this year in case I get a spot where I need to dangle one of my workers and some lighter duty arborist rope.

    I also have the full arborist setup but it's too cumbersome to use on a roof. One strong guy on the peak of the roof holding onto the guy doing the work is about the only way that works. I've only used the safety harness once this year.

    I realized this year that the finite fibers on performance fleece are very grabby on tile roofs and allow me to get to places that were not possible before.
     

Share This Page