Recovery after fungus

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by MSlawnman, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. MSlawnman

    MSlawnman LawnSite Member
    Messages: 151

    I have a centipede lawn in South, Coastal Mississippi. I've been fighting/managing fungal infections on this lawn for the last couple of years. I believe it's large patch disease but was not able to get a definitive diagnosis. The county extension agent that has examined the yard said it's a fungal infection as did a yard service man that was here for a sprinkler problem.

    In any case, I'm rotating fungicides (Bayleton, chlorothalanil and propiconazole) on a regular basis and seeing some good results. The unaffected areas are doing quite well and the affected areas are no longer spreading. The reseeding I've done in the affected areas are starting to grow and look healthy.

    What I'm wondering is does anyone have recommendations to help spur the growth in the affected areas? Although I believe I have the fungus under control, the affected turf has very slow growth, dries out very quickly (root damage) and just isn't bouncing back well.
     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 15,074

    Be sure to rotate conizoles with another type chemistry such as the strobins. This reduces the chance of fungicide resistance.
    Sorry, there is no centipede around these parts. Local advice is better. Take a look at Clemson information.
    https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/brown-patch-large-patch-diseases-of-lawns/

    Do not overfertilize--I have heard centipede does not like much nitrogen, no phosphorous, and needs acid soil.
    Try to water deeply, but no more than two days per week to reduce the average humidity. Water in the daytime to be sure your grass never goes to bed wet. Brown patch spreads fast if the humidity and temperature are high. Night temps below 60 are good --above 60 may result in spread of the fungus. Postpone fertilizer until nights are cool.
     
  3. MSlawnman

    MSlawnman LawnSite Member
    Messages: 151

    Thanks Riggle. Yep, trying to rotate the fungicides. I’m having to treat about every two weeks to stay on top of this. As soon as I think I’m doing OK, it pops up somewhere else.

    Weather is the big problem... temps in mid 90’s during day and mid 70’s at night with humidity running 70% to 80%. Luckily, or not, not too much rain right now. I keep watering to bare minimum and only in early morning.

    I’ve held off fertilizing at all at this time because I’ve read that will simply feed the fungus and because centipede doesn’t require much fertilizer BUT the grass sure looks like it could use SOMETHING to help it.
     
  4. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 15,074

  5. MSlawnman

    MSlawnman LawnSite Member
    Messages: 151

  6. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Ark
    Messages: 5,497

    MS
    Where are you located? Are you sure you're seeing large patch now. In warm season turf it usually shows itself during cooler temps 50-80 range
     
  7. MSlawnman

    MSlawnman LawnSite Member
    Messages: 151

    ArTurf: I'm located in south, coastal Mississippi. I agree, everything I've read about these fungal problems indicate it should be a problem in the fall or spring. But it's going on now. Grass starts to turn yellow in roughly circular patches then dies. If I can hit it with a fungicide right away it seems to stop the progression but the affected turf is very slow to recover. I've used some over the counter granular stuff (Bayers product, forgot what the active ingredient is) on the entire two and a half acres in the spring (very expensive) and still had problems. Now I use spray-on applications and treat problem areas and surrounding good areas about every three weeks.

    I've done numerous soil tests on pooled samples and on individual areas of the lawn. pH is low - 4.5, but not too low for centipede as I understand. Micronutrients are in acceptable range. I've even applied a couple of rounds of Nimitz-pro in case it was nematodes.

    The unaffected areas of the lawn are doing great, in fact, I posted on a separate thread that in one section of the lawn I now have a thatch build-up problem. Which worries me greatly because I know that's an invitation for fungus to start. I'm keeping the thatch under control in the majority of the areas of this lawn though and addressing the area that does have a thatch build-up. Strangely, the areas of the lawn that are plagued with fungus do not have any thatch problem at all. Some areas are under very large live oak trees and I know shade is a factor but other areas are in full sunlight with no shade at all.

    I can't sterilize the mower from one area to the next but I do bag the clippings and dispose of them.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  8. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 14,059

    Good practiceThumbs UpThumbs Up
    Almost sounds like dollar spot
     
  9. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 15,074

    The idea that thatch causes fungus is rather "old-school" in my mind. I think thatch is a sign of vigorous growth--healthy grass. Probably an abundance of strong rhizomes and stolons.
    I am not sure if a pH of 4.5 is too low. Discuss with an experienced local lawn care business owner.
    Certain fertilizer elements and micronutrients are not available when the soil is highly acidic.

    http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=C1003&title=Centipedegrass Decline
     
    grass4gas and hort101 like this.
  10. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Ark
    Messages: 5,497

    Hmmm, might be fairy ring or the beginnings of it before it becomes a ring. You mention dries out fast so maybe......
     
    MSlawnman likes this.

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