Regular pistol grip walk behind mowers seem troublesome for new workers.

hort101

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
S.E. New England
That can happen, but first the teacher must teach and the learner must learn. There must be a willing mind. People for the most part are not meek enough, humble enough to learn from the ground up, the ego gets in the way. People also cannot 'stay' their minds on a given subject that doesn't thrill them, and last but not least, people do not appreciate hard work like they used to. The utopia, kumbaya, lovey dovey is unrealistic in most people.
Agree with alot of this

Everyone always wants to start out an expert or watch a video and be experienced utoob has made it worse imo
 

Toro44

LawnSite Senior Member
We had a guy who was learning to trim, didn’t want to hear about how we did things. He watched YouTube and had it down lol. He was running through 3-4 spoils of trimmer line a day, still not sure where it all went. Didn’t take well to teaching or feedback. Can’t win them all
 

HeadScratcher

LawnSite Senior Member
I'm with OakNut. Sure, mowing lawns as an employe is a job, a vocation. You can call it a trade, but it's not a skilled trade like an electrician or plumber. EVERYTHING take some degree of skill, but if you can become as competent at doing something in one week as someone who's been doing it for years, it's an entry level position. And if you can't, maybe you're not too smart or are too stubborn to take direction.

Imagine what it's like for someone in the fast food industry on their first day with no prior experience. They see all their "seasoned" co-workers running around like chickens with their heads cut off, and it looks like pure insanity, but within a week or two they've adjusted and you'd be hard pressed to pick out who the new person is.

Is this a "career" job that deserves $18/hr or more? Not to me. It's an entry level position, a stepping stone to something else - shift manager, manager, whatever, or it's a temporary job to help pay off student loans or what have you. Onward and upward.
 

Hawkshot99

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
New York
I'm with OakNut. Sure, mowing lawns as an employe is a job, a vocation. You can call it a trade, but it's not a skilled trade like an electrician or plumber. EVERYTHING take some degree of skill, but if you can become as competent at doing something in one week as someone who's been doing it for years, it's an entry level position. And if you can't, maybe you're not too smart or are too stubborn to take direction.

Imagine what it's like for someone in the fast food industry on their first day with no prior experience. They see all their "seasoned" co-workers running around like chickens with their heads cut off, and it looks like pure insanity, but within a week or two they've adjusted and you'd be hard pressed to pick out who the new person is.

Is this a "career" job that deserves $18/hr or more? Not to me. It's an entry level position, a stepping stone to something else - shift manager, manager, whatever, or it's a temporary job to help pay off student loans or what have you. Onward and upward.
What job do you ever get, that your plan is to forever stay at the entry level of it and work a career? The goal is always to move upward through the company, or as a stepping stone to the next company.
 

OakNut

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Pittsburgh PA
What job do you ever get, that your plan is to forever stay at the entry level of it and work a career? The goal is always to move upward through the company, or as a stepping stone to the next company.
Ask the guy who wants to buy the world a Coke.
He seems to have life all figured out.
LOL!
 

Wobbles

LawnSite Member
Last few new hire’s I’ve had on our smallest walk seem to really struggle with operating.. walking yard with no blades on, hard time figuring the controls, missing patches turning, shooting grass all over, and not mowing the curbline are just some.

Yes they’ve all been fully explained and given a tutorial as well as practicing at shop. I’ve been running walks for over 10 years and don’t remember having these much issues getting started, ever..It almost seems like a common sense lacking in all, who are/were good hires.

Not everyone can mow, and mowing your own lawn doesn’t count. This is partially why I am considering getting a couple toro 30’s again. The KISS method.
I demo'd one of those belt driven walk behinds a few years back. Those things are just a disaster waiting to happen.

The controls are backwards and dangerous, what kind of idiot would manufacture a mower where you have to steer the thing by using the brakes to turn left and right. I wouldn't even use it if it was given to me for free.

I'm sure you could learn to use it overtime, but why on earth would you want to. While i'm sure they're cheaper then a hydro machine. They definitely won't be after you or an employees accidentally drives it into someones pool/house and or car.
 

Hurryupelectric

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Charleston
I was thinking a hydro walk worked the same way, the controls were breaks. This made sense to me because I believe reverse is achieved by squeezing the hand controls past a neutral position and into reverse. If squeezing the controls made forward movement then the operator would have to move through full speed to get to the reverse. I would imagine that would be asking for trouble as well in tight spots.
 

hal

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Kansas
I was thinking a hydro walk worked the same way, the controls were breaks. This made sense to me because I believe reverse is achieved by squeezing the hand controls past a neutral position and into reverse. If squeezing the controls made forward movement then the operator would have to move through full speed to get to the reverse. I would imagine that would be asking for trouble as well in tight spots.
Hydros operate on the same principle as the belts, let out to full speed, squeeze to brake then full squeeze to reverse....
 

JCLM Canada

LawnSite Member
Location
London, Canada
Last few new hire’s I’ve had on our smallest walk seem to really struggle with operating.. walking yard with no blades on, hard time figuring the controls, missing patches turning, shooting grass all over, and not mowing the curbline are just some.

Yes they’ve all been fully explained and given a tutorial as well as practicing at shop. I’ve been running walks for over 10 years and don’t remember having these much issues getting started, ever..It almost seems like a common sense lacking in all, who are/were good hires.

Not everyone can mow, and mowing your own lawn doesn’t count. This is partially why I am considering getting a couple toro 30’s again. The KISS method.
I concur, the learning curve for pistol grips can be aggravating and expensive to put up with for the owner/operator. One reason I Went to the 30".
 

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