Renovation in process...

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by awayne, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 13,674

    I don't know. Looks similar to dollarspot. Could be a bit of fungus. Unusual during cool weather.
    Pythium is common on new seed if its wet and very hot--unlikely it is pythium.

    Take a careful look--is the white spot attacking rye but not fescue?
     
    hort101 likes this.
  2. awayne

    awayne LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 309

    No rye grass it is a blend of 3 different fescues.

    I’m going to also ask the place I get my seed and fert from to see what they say. From what I can see it is only that one little spot but still don’t want it lol
     
  3. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 13,674

    The bad spot could be due to some variation in the compost. A bit of sawdust which might tie-up the nitrogen. Or a bit of something toxic to grass--a bit of sawdust saturated with hydraulic oil--paint thinner--or kitty pee.
     
  4. awayne

    awayne LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 309

    Wee wee in my soil...oh no! Lol

    So in other words if it greens up with fert then over time it should even out?
     
  5. Methodical2

    Methodical2 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 54

    I plan to use Milorganite as my last fertilizer for the season. It doesn't have as much N as some of the other stuff, but I'll put it down a bit heavier. That's definitely a slow released fertilizer.
     
  6. awayne

    awayne LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 309

    I thought about that as well... ATS has some other fertilizer that they recommended for the tttf but that is for next year.
     
  7. Methodical2

    Methodical2 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 54

    I did some more research and found that Milorganite is not the best as a winterizer, so I may go with Lesco 46-0-0 later this month when the grass stops growing.
     
  8. awayne

    awayne LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 309

    If it isn’t slow release then that will be bad and could cause snow mold if your somewhere that gets snow. I was told by where I buy my seed from that I shouldn’t apply any fertilizer now and just wait till the spring as it could cause more harm then good now.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  9. Methodical2

    Methodical2 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 54

    I seem to be noting several different opinions of winterization, which is to be expected. I've read that you want fast release nitrogen when the grass stops growth, which will be stored over winter and then provide early green up without any early spring fertilization. Also, I read that slow release type fertilizer don't microbials stop working at colder temps, so there's no benefit. One thing I always did in the past was use Scotts Winterizer (not sure if it had slow release N) and never ever had any snow mold or any other issue with my lawn. I am in the DC area where we get snow most years.

    Below is a thread from another board on this topic. Check it out and draw your own conclusion.

    https://aroundtheyard.com/forums2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=15109
     
  10. Methodical2

    Methodical2 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 54

    Just as a note. The article I linked to above is just the opposite of what you posted with regard to slow release N, but it stresses the correct timing to apply fast release N. Also, it speaks on Potassium being the cause of potential snow mold and not N. So, there's definitely a differing of opinions on this subject. Again, check it out.
     

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