Safety!

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by DanielLawnCare, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. DanielLawnCare

    DanielLawnCare LawnSite Member
    Messages: 89

    I'm just northeast of cincinnati ohio. And I'm not mr safty that' not what I'm getting at just getting real world information of the health risks from the guys that do this every day. When I'm out mowing I can smell the guys spraying a lawn a block away. I have to wonder what 20, 30, 40, years of that feels like to breathe lol. Also is granular fert and spot spraying safer? In other words less airborne? Or is granular fert dusty at that volume of application?
     
    hort101 likes this.
  2. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 9,867

    Imo fert is alot less toxic
    I think @Marine03112 had some issues from the 24d
    I here you on the constant exposure I don't like the smell and don't trust the exposure to the herbacide

    The reason I ask for your location is because some states are different and it may not be worth getting license better to sub it out or work with an applicator you refer the spraying to and they might give you some work they don't handle

    For pest control there's alot to learn to identify and properly treat most good ap guys have an interest in chemistry and pest managementThumbs Up
     
  3. DanielLawnCare

    DanielLawnCare LawnSite Member
    Messages: 89

    It's a huge market in this area EVERYONE wants fert and weed prevention. At the same time aeration and overseeding is a really hard sell. And no one is willing to put a drop of water on there lawn. After 10 years I have plenty of weekly mowing customers and landscape mantanance/jobs. But I still can't grow at a rate to surpass solo when 4 out of 5 calls I get want weed/feed/weekly maintenance from the same company. So I know I'm going to have to offer at least a basic fert plan going forward to have to the future growth I want but also have 37 years to retirement haha that's a lot of exposure.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  4. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 9,867

    Another option is organic or low risk treatment
    Maybe a combo do some yourself and hire out the rest

    Either way I would recommend some classes or schooling it will tech you the proper techniques and learn identification and plant sciences

    You will need pest insurance and a licenseThumbs Up
     
    Wye Oak Tree likes this.
  5. GRANTSKI

    GRANTSKI LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,302

    I broke out in hives after mowing a treated lawn (I didn't see the sign). Went home and passed out almost like a mild bee sting reaction. No sure what it was treated with I was a high school kid at the time working for another company. But I've been sketched out by lawn chemicals since then.
     
  6. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 13,931

    About 20 years ago there was a study of 2,4-D absorption by volunteers who sprayed grass with a hose and gun. I think it was in Canada. Their urine was chemically analyzed and tested afterwards to see how much was absorbed through the skin and lungs. Most absorption was through the skin.The levels never rose to the danger point. Inexperienced sprayers had more absorption.
    The study suggested that waterproof spraying chaps would reduce absorption through the fabric pants.
    Be sure to use equipment and pressure such that there is no drift nor mist produced. Use equipment that produces large droplets that fall to the earth immediately. Chemlawn gun with white nozzles, for instance. Pressure 100 pounds at the reel or less.
    Drift control agent or thickener--maybe--especially if there is wind. Do not spray on windy days.
    A six-inch spray-gun extension keeps the solution farther away from your legs.
     
    greendoctor and hort101 like this.
  7. DanielLawnCare

    DanielLawnCare LawnSite Member
    Messages: 89

    Those are all good points and suggestions. Thanks to all for the response. And I didn't know there was any classes available??? I thought it was either get the licensing and insurance and good luck or a 4 year college degree? Or is college what you ment by classes?
     
    hort101 likes this.
  8. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 9,867

    Sometimes adult education or a certificate college program
    Some areas have a class that prepares you for applicator test
    See what is available in your area look at agriculture schools and collegesThumbs Up
     
    dKoester likes this.
  9. DanielLawnCare

    DanielLawnCare LawnSite Member
    Messages: 89

    That would be fantastic! Thanks for the info hort101.
     
    dKoester and hort101 like this.
  10. oak branch

    oak branch LawnSite Member
    Messages: 33

    I am looking for new clothing to apply in. Any suggestions? Looking for pants and long sleeve shirts.
     

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