Sealing trailer deck with used motor oil and diesel mixture

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by fatboynormmie, Aug 15, 2019.

  1. fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,432

    7C058CCF-6EB1-49D0-9A46-5F33F4680B6E.jpeg 8C1C9FC0-A42D-4611-A537-01E0B870AC00.jpeg 7AFB3654-40C8-417A-8E39-63F8E515E506.jpeg

    Had been researching on what was best to use to seal trailer decking .I kept coming across how well used motor oil and diesel mixture works for preserving any wood against the elements. I ended up using a 50/50 mixture of each and it worked very well. It sucked into the wood completely leaving the wood dry to touch.

    It basically went on just like a normal oil stain from a box store. It is not slippery at all and I really like the color of it. I simply sprayed the mixture on the boards with a pump sprayer and it went on in mins. I just let it sit in the sun for the day and it turned out great. I coated the top and bottom and plan on recoating every season. Hopefully this will be my last redeck on this trailer. The last pic shows the finished product all dry. This is a great cheap way to maintain our trailers. Figured I would pass it along.
     
    sehitchman likes this.
  2. Mumblingboutmowers

    Mumblingboutmowers LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 766

    Motor oil does treat wood well, I've known people to use it on wood siding. I don't like the idea of putting it on a trailer deck though. I think when it's raining you're going to find it to be slippery and you're going to be tracking it around with your boots. Also you will probably have some drips off the bottom of the trailer for a while, which is no big deal as long as your not parked in a customer's paved or concrete driveway for a while. I also like being able to sit or kneel on my trailer deck now and then and I don't want oil rubbed on my pants.
     
  3. redmax fan

    redmax fan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,890

    if i were to do that ide cut all the boards and fit them in place . then ide remove them and shoot all 6 edges with oil then bake in the sun for days . also ide pilot drill screw holes while on trailer before oiling so that the holes would get filled with oil .
     
  4. OP
    OP
    fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,432

    I was thinking the same thing but the wood sucked it right up and it left the wood completely dry . I have kneeled and sat on it and didn’t have any transfer on my clothing. If I run my hand over it my hand is totally dry. If the motor oil content was at a higher percentage to the diesel I could see it happening but at 50/50 it’s rather thin and was totally absorbed on my trailers wood.
     
    Mumblingboutmowers likes this.
  5. Mumblingboutmowers

    Mumblingboutmowers LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 766

    I suppose it depends on how dry the wood is and how heavy you put it on. Putting the perfect amount on to match what the wood will suck up would be the key, but if you didn't get it right, by putting too much on or the wood not sucking it up as much as expected, then there would most likely be a mess that you could not clean up.

    I just spray Thompson's water seal on mine every few years after I pressure wash the boards. I never even do the bottom of the boards.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,432

    All the dark spots around the torx screws were caused by rust. As I was drilling the boards the metal filings were sitting on top of the wood . It rained overnite before I blew the decking off and the metal shavings rusted and made the area around the screws darker. You can see it in the second pic. So the dark spots on the last pic aren’t oil but rust spots. Just wanted to point that out.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,432

    If the coat would have been to heavy I have a stockpile of PIG pads for oil in my garage and I would have just wiped off the excess. Didn’t have to though and it sucked in just like the Thompson’s would have as I have used similar products in the past on decks and fencing and they both went on and absorbed the same way.
     
  8. rippinryno

    rippinryno LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,709

    That will be slick when it rains. Why not use a water seal product?
     
  9. OP
    OP
    fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,432

    It’s no slicker then if I would have coated it with an oil base clear coat from a big box store. Oil is oil ! The mixture in the sprayer is like the consistency of water. Very thin and was sucked up by the wood and was completely dry to touch in a 1/2 day in the blazing sun.

    The motor oil gives the diesel fuel/oil a warmer color and adds a lil more solids. Now water beads nicely when it rains . I suspect if I kept adding coats it might be slick as I could see it just drying on the top surface of the wood and not sucking in. But just one coat it all sucked in and it’s sealed nicely. I will probably hit it every year or so as general maintenance.
     
  10. Wolfgang

    Wolfgang LawnSite Member
    from Ireland
    Messages: 68

    We use creosote and black oil mixed and it extends the life of the wood a lot, if done while wood is dry and given a few coats and left soak in its no more slippy than normal wood when wet.
    We have done our last trailer with pressure treated wood used for decking which is guaranteed not to rot for 10 years, and grooved as well.
    https://www.topline.ie/garden-outdo.../treated-flat-decking-timber-board-150-x-35mm
     
    fatboynormmie likes this.

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