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Should I sharpen my trencher teeth

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Mr. Vern, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. Mr. Vern

    Mr. Vern LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 632

    I have a trencher on my Dingo and it seems to trench a lot slower than it used to. I checked the teeth and they are not sharp like a new one would be. Would it benefit me any to sharpen the teeth, and if so how would I go about it. What angles would I want to maintain?
     
  2. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,029

    Does this trencher have a digging wheel or digging chain ?
     
  3. lawnmaniac883

    lawnmaniac883 LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,613

    The teeth may be tungsten carbide. If so, then you will need specialty equipment to do this.
     
  4. Mr. Vern

    Mr. Vern LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 632

    It's got a chain. I hadn't thought about the fact that it might be tungsten or some kind of hardened steel. I might just take a grinder to them tomorrow and then do some time studiies to see if I have sped it up. I just hate to spend all that time for nothing.
     
  5. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,029

    We have 4 Ditch Witch trenchers in our rental fleet as of now, Ranging from walk behind to ride on and many others over the years. We have never sharpened a tooth on a chain. Ours have a type of carbide leading edge on them and sharpening would damage the tooth and cause for replacement.
     
  6. Vermeer

    Vermeer Inactive
    from Iowa
    Messages: 153

    If the teeth on your chain are worn they need to be replaced not sharpened. Your time and effort spent sharpening would far outweigh any tooth cost and would provide limited returns. If the teeth are welded and not bolted to the chain you will still have some work to do. A trencher chain is lust like a chain saw, when the teeth are dull and worn expect to get significantly less production 50%+
     
  7. Vermeer

    Vermeer Inactive
    from Iowa
    Messages: 153

    By the way the carbide inserts or material on the leading edge of the tooth will destroy most grinders or sharpeners!
     
  8. lawnmaniac883

    lawnmaniac883 LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,613

    Yup, carbide is much harder than most grinding wheels...takes diamond to sharpen.
     
  9. Mr. Vern

    Mr. Vern LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 632

    Thanks everyone for the awesome responses! It makes sense to me that they would be some form of hardened steel. Any idea what the replacement cost would run for new teeth. They appear to be bolt on replacements. It is a 6" width and 3' depth. I will check with my Toro dealer, but frankly they don't seem all that interested in the Dingo market. I believe that they make much more money on the various other larger types of equipment they sell. Also, we dig in mostly clay and some sandy loam soils(seldom ever any rock), how many feet of trench would one expect to be able to dig with a set of teeth in these soils.

    Thanks again all!

    Mr. Vern
     
  10. Mr. Vern

    Mr. Vern LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 632

    BTW - how sharp should the teeth be? I never really thought much about the teeth needing to be sharp until I was at a farm show and the Boxer dealer was there with a trencher attachment and I felt the teeth and they were really sharp. I went back to the shop and checked mine and they were dull. There is plenty of meat left on them and the trencher is in excellent shape with no signs of wear but the teeth are not sharp at all. My guys were trenching a yard with large roots the other day and couldn't get through them and I got to thinking that sharper teeth might have gotten through it. I had to run back to the yard and get the stump grinder - major loss of time and productivity. If the chain is reasonably priced and will provide a decent service life, and can double our productivity, it sounds like a no-brainer.
     

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