Sickening Reality...Just Read

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by Chilehead, May 20, 2019.

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  1. Chilehead

    Chilehead LawnSite Silver Member
    Male, from Stockbridge, GA
    Messages: 2,182

    I am well aware of the labor crunch our industry is in, and am sure most of you are too. As a solo op, I can only give myself a raise if route density increases, or if a high-paying client comes along that replaces a low-paying one. The third option (and the most elusive) is getting more help on board. I won't rehash what I've written on here about solo op perception again, but can't help but ask if anyone here has been in the predicament I'm in....
    Routinely I have had to turn down VERY BIG opportunities such as large apartment/condo complexes, hoa common grounds, office parks, and retail centers due to the dearth of job applications coming in. Property managers I have good relationships with are requesting that I bid on accounts like these, and I can't because the man power isn't there. I am closely approaching seven figures in work that I have had to turn away, which is exponentially bigger than what I gross. For me, it is truly sickening and disturbing that I can have all the resources in the world to grow my business to 7-figure status in a year, and the only obstacle is that those who can apply would rather stay poor making $9.00/hour in some air-conditioned environment instead of $60K/year doing grounds maintenance, and retire rich with a company-funded pension...:dizzy:! I understand that people who are in college aren't going to apply, and that's fine--they can pursue whatever career they want. But why would someone who doesn't have an interest in college academics still want to stay poor when they can have the quality of life that their academically-inclined peers have? It seems like mental illness, seriously.
     
  2. Mowing monkey.

    Mowing monkey. LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 660

    Are you actually advertising a 60k salary? Most of these positions pay 12-15 an hour and it should be obvious why we aren’t overrun with quality help.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Chilehead

    Chilehead LawnSite Silver Member
    Male, from Stockbridge, GA
    Messages: 2,182

    $17.50- $20.00/hr base wage.... plus commission. 50+ hours a week year round. This is not foreman's pay. This is low-man-on-the-totem-pole-bottom-of-the-basement pay. You do the math.
     
    zlandman and Cam15 like this.
  4. GreenscapeCT

    GreenscapeCT LawnSite Member
    Messages: 240

    You need to walk the tight rope.

    To expand you need to take on more work, for which you don’t have the labor to do.

    The industry is struggling with a small labor pool, MOST industries are.

    Are these VERY BIG opportunity potential jobs calling you because your pricing is low?

    Maybe Increase your hourly wage?
     
    TrainingWheels, Tara Ann and hort101 like this.
  5. GreenscapeCT

    GreenscapeCT LawnSite Member
    Messages: 240

    Georgia gets hot and very humid, as I remember.

    There will be members here who may faint when they read your base wage.

    How are you advertising for help?
     
    Cam15 likes this.
  6. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 18,469

    Glad you mentioned the worker pool Thumbs UpThumbs Up

    The green biz is pulling from the same labor pool from entry level jobs to construction so it's gotten way more competitive

    Imo too many companies shrink there available pool with high expectations and low pay for example and have a hard time attracting from outside the traditional pool where theres actually better and more people that actually work and want tooThumbs Up
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
  7. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 18,469

    And this isnt directed at you chileheadThumbs Up
     
  8. GreenscapeCT

    GreenscapeCT LawnSite Member
    Messages: 240


    Good point!

    Personally, I think mowing is easier than construction labor. However, you need people who can think and learn if you want to have a good maintenance crew. In entry construction, it’s a lot of heavy lifting and usually back-breaking type work.
     
  9. GreenscapeCT

    GreenscapeCT LawnSite Member
    Messages: 240

    I don’t think mowing-monkey was criticizing you.

    I think he was, as I am, curious as to your advertised rate of pay.

    $20 per hour is common where I am.
     
  10. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 18,469

    I agree on the back breaking part I was offered a job in framing and carpentry for a good company but turned it down because of the back breaking part:weightlifter:

    On the otherside if a person is physically fit and is in the labor pool the construction side is appealing, better pay, sometimes benefits and some offer more year round workpayup
     
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