Some light reading material

grass man 11

LawnSite Bronze Member
If all you did was mow with it, and produce using just it, Then you can follow the math formula I described above. This will simulate if using that mower, with a team of 6 guys, would also pay for a proper manager plus profit.
 
OP
Hurryupelectric

Hurryupelectric

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Charleston
I think some guys might be like “are they still talking about the sw15”. But I do enjoy the discussion, I don’t want to give the impression that I’m unwilling to reason the numbers. But it’s hard to put a metric on a good amount of reasons I bought, and I think that’s your point. With the records I’m keeping, after taxes are paid, I will at least know what the overall numbers are. How many miles I drove, how much gas in mowers and then in car, how many dollars came in, revenue compared to total time gate down to gate up. I will know how much I made total but will have to treat it like a salary because all the maintenance and little things aren’t recorded. I definitely “worked” a lot, I have many unrecorded hours that should have been accounted for.
 

Toro44

LawnSite Senior Member
To the original point of the thread. If you're staying solo. If you want to mow lawns more power to you and it may always be in the mix. If you want to venture out, find your niche, become an expert on things customers can't do well themselves. Build your business around those services. You can then charge for the expertise, not just the labor. Making money is a lot easier at that point.
 

grass man 11

LawnSite Bronze Member
I think some guys might be like “are they still talking about the sw15”. But I do enjoy the discussion, I don’t want to give the impression that I’m unwilling to reason the numbers. But it’s hard to put a metric on a good amount of reasons I bought, and I think that’s your point. With the records I’m keeping, after taxes are paid, I will at least know what the overall numbers are. How many miles I drove, how much gas in mowers and then in car, how many dollars came in, revenue compared to total time gate down to gate up. I will know how much I made total but will have to treat it like a salary because all the maintenance and little things aren’t recorded. I definitely “worked” a lot, I have many unrecorded hours that should have been accounted for.
Lol. I agree. My point is as you do things and discover new opportunities, do your self a favor and run numbers, let the numbers and logic guide you. Most guys here would rather talk about mowers or trailers or the perception of how they are suddenly making more money, yet half are going broke and they don’t know it until one day they wake up and their truck is crap, their mower is crap, their customer list is crap and they have nothing to show for it all. Don’t work for free, don’t work for an average wage. You take a lot of risks being on your own, make sure it’s worth your while. Lots of good jobs on the market with lots of benefits, make sure you greatly exceeding that income level.
 
OP
Hurryupelectric

Hurryupelectric

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Charleston
This arrived today

C9447EA2-C96C-451C-BC17-1CEE18CD4A55.jpeg
 

SS Lawn Care

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Broken Arrow, OK
In my market there seems to be a comfortable slightly above middle ground. Right now I think that a nice square lawn that is sprayed and ferted is kinda what I want, it’ll be a weekly account and look nice but be easy. The things I really don’t like doing are bushes and and the wide bare borders around beds that need a vertical string trimming and then an edger around.

I almost think I’m going for a nice fast food type experience, laugh if you want. Some restaurants, particularly seafood, just pump people in and out the doors. It’s good food and overseen by a proper Cheff but once ordered it’s on the table in 5 minutes and 10 minutes later you get a check. Some of this is exaggerated but y’all probably get the point. Easy to service lawns that are properly taken care of would fit me well. I don’t mind redundancy, I enjoy the repetition and tiny efficiencies gained through repetition. I would just run my route and come home for dinner.
I had a similar thought regarding my lawns. Last year, I overhauled my lawn route and focused on my smaller, faster, and more profitable lawns. I made a concerted effort to keep the route density very tight also. I got rid of many out of the way lawns, and underpriced - over-hassled larger lawns. As a rule, when I was considering picking up new lawns, my goal was that it needed to be quickly and efficiently mowed with a 36" mower. Basically, I hunted for 1/4 acre lots. I referred larger lots like 1/2 acre - 1 acre lots to a friend in the business. I had a schedule this past season that really worked well for me and I felt pretty balanced and not burned out at the end of the season. I devoted all day Monday, all day Tuesday, and Wednesday morning to Light Landscape work and getting the lawn treatments for the week completed. The landscape work ranged from installing new flowerbeds, planting, mulching, installing small flagstone patios, small fence repair, and regular hedge trimming and bed maintenance. I don't have a ton of lawn treatments, but they are packaged in with a lot of my lawn and landscape customers. I could do 7-10 a week, sometimes more if needed, and complete each round in about 5 weeks. These are average 1/4 acre or less lots too. There is a lot of profit treating small quick lawns. Wednesday afternoon - Friday was a solid lawn mowing route. All the lawns could be mowed Thursday and Friday if needed, by busting it, but Wednesday afternoon was a buffer if rain developed later in the week. Saturday mornings were on the table too if need be, but it was rare from mid summer to fall. A couple of good days doing landscape work early in the week set us up for a good week. There is higher profit margin, plus I enjoy the change of pace. It lets your well rounded knowledge of the total landscape shine. The end of the week mowing route was nice too, slightly different pace and sort of on autopilot as you near the end of the week.
 
OP
Hurryupelectric

Hurryupelectric

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Charleston
I had a similar thought regarding my lawns. Last year, I overhauled my lawn route and focused on my smaller, faster, and more profitable lawns. I made a concerted effort to keep the route density very tight also. I got rid of many out of the way lawns, and underpriced - over-hassled larger lawns. As a rule, when I was considering picking up new lawns, my goal was that it needed to be quickly and efficiently mowed with a 36" mower. Basically, I hunted for 1/4 acre lots. I referred larger lots like 1/2 acre - 1 acre lots to a friend in the business. I had a schedule this past season that really worked well for me and I felt pretty balanced and not burned out at the end of the season. I devoted all day Monday, all day Tuesday, and Wednesday morning to Light Landscape work and getting the lawn treatments for the week completed. The landscape work ranged from installing new flowerbeds, planting, mulching, installing small flagstone patios, small fence repair, and regular hedge trimming and bed maintenance. I don't have a ton of lawn treatments, but they are packaged in with a lot of my lawn and landscape customers. I could do 7-10 a week, sometimes more if needed, and complete each round in about 5 weeks. These are average 1/4 acre or less lots too. There is a lot of profit treating small quick lawns. Wednesday afternoon - Friday was a solid lawn mowing route. All the lawns could be mowed Thursday and Friday if needed, by busting it, but Wednesday afternoon was a buffer if rain developed later in the week. Saturday mornings were on the table too if need be, but it was rare from mid summer to fall. A couple of good days doing landscape work early in the week set us up for a good week. There is higher profit margin, plus I enjoy the change of pace. It lets your well rounded knowledge of the total landscape shine. The end of the week mowing route was nice too, slightly different pace and sort of on autopilot as you near the end of the week.
There was a big difference in the summer on easy lawns vs trimming nightmares. I don’t care how much I can get for some intricately landscaped yard requiring all kinds of stuff in the heat. We have a lot of houses with drainage ditches in the front yard and I hate having to be all contorted reaching down in them when it’s 96* and 99% humidity. I’ll be getting back into my car with the a/c running already and still take a few minutes to get my core temperature down. It’s not like that on a big open yard with trimming around the house and maybe a fence. People end up in the hospital taking terrible yards back to back on a dense route with little time to cool down. I’d rather just not kill myself.
 

Top Forums



Top