SSD or spray for turf/stone walkway

Discussion in 'Professional Discussions' started by kellanv, Feb 22, 2018.

  1. kellanv

    kellanv LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,222

    Hi all.

    Looking for opinions on this one. I have about ~280 linear feet of walkway, 4' wide that is natural edged flagstone in grass. There are quite a few curves so strips are likely not a good solution. I could overspray with 5' nozzles but that would be a ton of sprays since most areas would require just the walkway being watered (beds on both sides.)

    One thought I had would be to do a SSD. The pool deck is a grid of 24x24" stones so we will be using it there but the thought of winding drip tube through a natural pattern sounds painful.

    If we run the SSD under the stones/turf all together instead of fitting it only in the joints, do you see any issues there? Compaction and replacement come to mind. The roots (zoysia) should find that layer relatively quickly and you have the added benefit of less power washing due to overspray.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,898

    We do drip for square stones with sod joints all the time. I have done it for natural stones and you are right it sucks. If you put it under the whole thing in a grid and you get a leak it will require lifting the stones
     
  3. mitchgo

    mitchgo LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,232

    I was recently in Hawaii and there was this pavor walkway with a curvey 8-10" stone with a 2" gap between each stone. Ground cover was planted but 1/2" netafim was installed in every crack of the pavor walkway. It looked incredibly tedious to get all the bends in correctly without kinking. Soooo many Tee fittings. I understand completely the rules for water usage and I am thankful Washington doesn't require that as the only way to install around a walkway/ roadway.
     
  4. kellanv

    kellanv LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,222

    Yeah thankfully this is out of city limits so I have the option to overspray, especially since its a well system (likely will acid treat). That being said, I can't think of a clean way to do that, either.

    I was just in Hawai'i as well! We were on Kona (Big Island). My wife and I had a blast. I think the highlight was either the helicopter ride over the Pu'u O'o vent with bubbling lava or us hiking 12 mi round trip over terrible terrain to find active lava.
     
  5. mitchgo

    mitchgo LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,232

    That's awesome! Sounds amazing! A bit better then my trip. We were in Maui- we had a short company trip however I had something equivalent to the flu. I tired to be a trooper and keep up with the guys but I was in bed by 7pm every night. While they had beer I had my bottle of Dayquil. We did snorkeling Molokini Crater
     
  6. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,814

    I have never seen drip run in a grid pattern under stepping stones. Always between each stepping stone with as many tees and elbows as needed. I think a grid would work. Personally, I rather see artificial turf next to a pool. I also rather not have grass with stepping stones in it either. Mowing it correctly is a problem. If someone has managed to set the stones such that a mower can go over it, trimming so that Zoysia does not cover the stepping stone is still an issue.
     
  7. kellanv

    kellanv LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,222

    That sucks! I was really afraid of exactly that happening. I have two toddlers in daycare so getting sick is pretty high probability in my house. This was the first time in 4 years my wife and I decided to book a place to travel to for a week so I really didn't want it ruined.

    Yes normally I would agree. A lot of the time we do synthetic for situations like this. That being said, this is an english-style estate and the clients want a very particular look. Maintenance will be a pain but our guys are skilled enough to do that if needed.

    As far as under or between stones, we usually grid between square stones no problem but wow an irregular pattern will not be fun!
     
  8. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,814

    Army of maintenance workers with hand clippers? Or this. [​IMG]

    String trimmers are for hacking down brush.
     
  9. kellanv

    kellanv LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,222

    That thing looks awesomely dangerous.

    A lot of the time we can mow around it. Overgrowing the stones on the natural edge is not a big deal and in fact, is the goal of the look. The grids we use stick edgers, shears etc.

    Not sure why the string trimmer hate, though. They have their place outside of brush hogging. Hell, most of the mow-and-blows here use only those BUT most of the time people have some sort of steel border edging.
     
  10. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,814

    Because Zoysia looks B A D if string trimmed. I know if someone is doing it by the shredded leaf tips and either scalping down to the ground or the edges getting thatch from not being cut low enough. I personally use a Maruyama Landscape Blade for the side trimming. Edging is done with a stick edger. No string on my lawns.
     

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