• Online Events For Landscapers!
    With GIE+EXPO cancelled, virtual education and product launches are filling up the fall. Check out dates for Caterpillar, Exmark, NALP, and more. Click here to learn more.

Stone wall for patio

clandscaper

LawnSite Member
Location
Upstate NY
I am building a stone wall that will support the front end of a blue stone patio that is slightly elevated due to the slope of the yard.

I was originally going to dry lay the wall, so I dug my trench and started to build the wall on 6'' of compacted crusher run. However, after starting I decided to use mortar to give the wall more stability since the end of the patio will be resting on it. I am only using the mortar on the back side of the wall (not the face that will be shown), this way it gives the appearance of being dry stacked.

Will this method hold up over time ( I live in upstate NY) since it is resting on a compacted base instead of a poured footer? Any input is appreciated, thanks
 
OP
C

clandscaper

LawnSite Member
Location
Upstate NY
I just started it, so only have the first two courses done, but Ill get a pic up tomorrow after work. Any advice without seeing the pic? My major question is with the longevity of the patio if the front stones are supported by a wall that has mortar on the back side which is sitting on crushed stone instead of a concrete footer.
 

cgland

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Reading, PA
Most likely you will have some movement in your wall and failure of your patio. If you are truly hard up on the stone, I would dig, install a footer, block it up, and face w/ nat. stone. It's alot more work, but it will last you.

Chris
 
OP
C

clandscaper

LawnSite Member
Location
Upstate NY
the wall itself is only 1.5' tall. so do you think blocking it is necessary, or can i get away with just stacking my stone with a little mortar on the back?
 

Jay Works

LawnSite Member
Location
Groton, CT
You need to provide weep holes. The benefit of block retaining walls is the ability to drain the moisture from behind to minimize the freeze thaw.
 

Isobel

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
West of Boston
I had a client a few years ago who wanted a 2' tall bluestone planter, that looked dry laid, and then wanted seating areas on top.
So instead of using mortar, I used concrete, from behind, to act as a reinforcement to hold up to people sitting on top.

Seems to have worked out well.
 
Top