SureCan: New Gas Can

Discussion in 'Sponsor Announcements' started by SureCan Inc., Oct 12, 2015.

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  1. HEMTT

    HEMTT LawnSite Senior Member
    Male, from Redmond, WA
    Messages: 398

    I would be happy to time it this Saturday. I know the cans I'm currently using vary greatly, depending on the angle at which you hold the can, since they vent through the center nozzle itself. Why would you try to vent something in the center of a streaming fluid is beyond me. I have no doubt that your cans flow better than many I've used, many got donated to the municipal dump, hazardous waste collection area, filled with used oil. Since your can vents at the top, it should flow consistently through a wide range of fuel can angles. I just hate most CARB compliant cans, I've never spilled so much fuel, or waited so long in my life.
     
  2. OP
    OP
    SureCan Inc.

    SureCan Inc. LawnSite Member
    Messages: 42

    Keep us posted on your results. In regards to the vent in the spout is due to EPA and CARB regulations after 2009, they mandated that all fuel cans being manufactured could only have one hole in the can so the fill area is also the exit area. This regulation also states that all fuel cans cannot have any vents other than when it is being used so the vent had to be put in the flow spout. Since then we have changed that standard with our fuel cans and are pushing the envelope and leading the industry in innovation.
     
    The Swamp Fox likes this.
  3. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,336

    The location of the vent is immaterial. So long as the liquid is released at a lower level, air will only enter a small vent, and no liquid will leave, even if the vent is below the liquid level. The NoSpill can uses this principle to great effect, as do my Justrite and Cooper steel cans (unlike the other truly crappy plastic cans with the push-in spout now mandated by the EPA that glug). It's actually a great idea to do it this way, because there's less risk of being splashed by gas with this sort of vent. SureCan gets this right too (in their own way), unlike Eagle, who'se open top vent risks splashing much more.

    However, the height of the liquid above the drain determines the pressure it exits with (assuming the can is vented and has no head pressure), which helps determine how fast it exits.

    In the case of the Surecan, with the drain at the bottom, you're always pouring at maximum speed. With all of my cans (like yours), how much you tip it determines how fast it pours.

    I too plan to attempt to stopwatch pouring from a few 5 gallon cans. This thread has piqued my curiosity.
     
  4. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,336

    Except that Type II cans have two holes!

    The regulation is actually that the holes must be self closing (and must resist certain pressures).

    As I said in the post above, Eagle's Type II vent is completely separate from their pour spout (they actually use the spring loaded valve handle to jack open the fill neck while pouring).

    Anyway, I keep seeing people complaining about how they miss their vented cans. Even though good cans, SureCan included, do vent.
    They complain about pouring frustrations (which is typical for the cheap crap out there), but miss the point that modern RFG gas in openly vented cans goes bad many times faster than in a properly sealed can.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    SureCan Inc.

    SureCan Inc. LawnSite Member
    Messages: 42

    Than you for the feedback, We appreciate the communication and hope that once you actually see our can's in person and feel the durability and flowrate for yourself you will see how much easier it is to use. All other fuel cans still have to tip and pour like you stated.


    Head over to our YouTube Channel and watch our videos, it gives a good idea on how well we made our products!

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCONACW3Y9SrdeH7ewOHgs-A
     
  6. HEMTT

    HEMTT LawnSite Senior Member
    Male, from Redmond, WA
    Messages: 398

    OK, we dumped in 10 gallons of gasoline into my mower today. Thanks to a pretty good fuel gage I was able to get a full 5 gallons into each tank, it was close on one but it made it before overflowing. On both tests the time figure was BARELY under 2 minutes each. The first was 1:54 and the second was 1:59. This was a BEST case, I was able to hold the can with the spout almost perfectly vertical until the flow decreased as it going empty, I then tilted the can a further approx. 30 degrees and stopped the timer (my wife did) when it went from stream to drips. I know when I add the extended hose to the spout the time is probably nearly doubled, the venting doesn't work well.
     
  7. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,336

    Just put 5 gallons of gas into the car with my old style type II steel can (from the days of leaded gas) with the 1" dispensing hose. 1 minute 13 seconds.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  8. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,336

    5 gallons again. This time with the same style can but with a 5/8" hose. 1 minute 21 seconds.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. OP
    OP
    SureCan Inc.

    SureCan Inc. LawnSite Member
    Messages: 42

    Which can were you using?
     
  10. HEMTT

    HEMTT LawnSite Senior Member
    Male, from Redmond, WA
    Messages: 398

    Since it was your thread I really didn't want to mention the competition, of which I have no stake. Unless of course, you consider 14 of them a stake. I timed the No-Spill 5 gallon can.
     
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