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"The Sorry Saga of the Blue Spruce"

Discussion in 'Fertilizers, Pesticides and Diseases' started by Trees Too, Feb 25, 2018.

  1. Trees Too

    Trees Too LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,965

    "The Sorry Saga of the Blue Spruce"

    By: Arborist I Am

    I do not like them -- Overuse!
    I'm talking about &%$#@!! Blue Spruce!
    They are no good in the Midwest;
    They get disease, and lots of pests;
    I would not plant them here or there;
    I would not plant them anywhere!
     
    TPendagast and Mark Oomkes like this.
  2. sjessen

    sjessen LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Knoxville, Tn
    Messages: 6,110

    Blue spruce is becoming less common is this area. They are difficult to get established and usually die after about 20 years. The hot and humid summers seem to do them in.
     
    Walker56 likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    Trees Too

    Trees Too LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,965

    INDEED! And that's the key right there, is the humidity of the Midwestern summers that the sorry Blue Spruce can't tolerate, and makes them disease prone!

    That's why they're the COLORADO Blue Spruce. They thrive in their native region of the Rockies and it's arid climate.
     
  4. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 17,284

    You beat me to it...
     
  5. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 16,658

    Alot of pest and disease problems effecting trees and shrubs
    The blue spruce is one example
    Lots of thrips,mites , beetles and caterpillarz are killing the trees and shrubs some are imported
    Biggest problem is growing imports in less than ideal environmentThumbs Up
     
    Walker56 and sjessen like this.
  6. OP
    OP
    Trees Too

    Trees Too LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,965

    INDEED! planting non-natives where they can't adapt! :realmad:

    AUSTRIAN Pine and EUROPEAN Mountain Ash come to mind.
     
    Mark Oomkes and hort101 like this.
  7. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 16,658

    Dealing with a lot of lace bug it's gotten worse last five years brought up from infected nursery stock from down south by builders:wall
    Much worse on pjm rhodies and Andromeda planted in full sun:hammerhead:
    Dogwood and redbud borers
    Pine beetles decimated red pines and are in the native pines now

    Oak wasp and Wilt becoming more common

    Boxwoods blight and insects more common:wall: :angry::realmad:
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2018
    Walker56 likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    Trees Too

    Trees Too LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,965

    Bradford Pears were once exalted as a totally pest free ornamental tree.

    And then "European Pear Rust" moved into town.......ugh! :cry::eek::blob2::help:
     
    hort101 likes this.
  9. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 16,658

    We could probably have a whole thread of pest free and plants that used to be"trouble free":hammerhead:

    Here's a common problem on a popular hedge
    Privets thrip and mite problems used to be no problem besides having to prune or shear often
     
    Walker56 likes this.
  10. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 17,284

    Pear rust would be better than them becoming an invasive species...due to the fact they aren't really sterile.

    Not to mention crappy branchy structure with heavy snow or ice.
     

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