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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Getting the run around. Had 3000 ft of silver travertine laid around a new pool. The pavers laid on the concrete slab, under the roofline, are becoming horribly discolored 5 months after being laid in random spots. Pool builder is no where to be found. Cleaners tested it and said it’s non organic. Don’t have any idea how to remedy it as it is ruining a very expensive project. Anyone have any thoughts? Could it be an install problem or drainage?
Rectangle Road surface Grey Wood Flagstone

Brown Road surface Rectangle Wood Flooring

Water Property Shade Swimming pool Architecture
 

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Looks like mold from high humidity, especially in a shade area where the sun isn’t able to dry it out. Maybe try a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water in a small area? Had a similar situation in a commercial building, after an engineer reviewed the problem, a Pool Pack dehumidifier was added to lower the ambient humidity. Hope this helps, good luck.
 

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Be careful with travertine and any chemicals, it etches easily. Bleach and ammonia will etch it, so will acidic compounds, even lemon juice will etch it. That's why I stopped using it in the 1980's, I will use granite, man made stones, concrete and bluestone among others, I'm done with travertine . . .

Edit: It is also SUPER porous, often with voids that must be filled and can stain easily if not properly sealed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Be careful with travertine and any chemicals, it etches easily. Bleach and ammonia will etch it, so will acidic compounds, even lemon juice will etch it. That's why I stopped using it in the 1980's, I will use granite, man made stones, concrete and bluestone among others, I'm done with travertine . . .

Edit: It is also SUPER porous, often with voids that must be filled and can stain easily if not properly sealed.
Sad, thank you though.
 

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I am no expert, however,

TEST a small inconspicuous area with the bleach method (if mold, bleach will work nearly immediately). RINSE the living **** out of it.

Find and eliminate the moisture problem.

If it works - research sealing it thereafter.

Your pool is beautiful!
 
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Looks to me like the joints are void (no grout) and the underlying slab is not pitched enough to allow the moisture to drain. The stagnant moisture is allowing mold/mildew to grow. The joints are way too tight, maybe 1/32" thick? So grouting the joints at this point will be nearly impossible..
I'd bring this up with the licensing board if you can't get thru to the installer.
The cut work looks great, but not grouting the joints on a mortars stone job? That is a big oversight in my opinion.
 
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