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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My property is small 80x100 but my grass is kentucky blue and very thick. The 21" troy built I have now does not give a good cut. Im unsure which I should get thinking of a walk behind wide deck cub cadet or maybe a 42" riding mower like a john deere. I just want a nice clean cut and be able to cut my lawn quicker than this damned 21".
 

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8000 square feet isn't a lot for a self-propelled 21. The problem you're going to run into in your situation is monetary constraints. If you want a good cut with a wider deck, buy a used commercial dual hydro WB and anybody on this site can help you choose a good used mower for your budget.

Cub Cadet and John Deere residential mowers are manufactured by MTD. This means they are built to terrible standards, won't give you a good cut, and will probably be hard to work on. Commercial units are meant to be easy to work on, otherwise no commercial contractor would buy that certain mower. Residential units are constructed cheaply and that's what you get.

If I were in your position, and I know we both have different goals, this is what I'd do:
Go out and buy a Snapper Commercial 21" self-propelled mower. You're going to drop about $850 on the beast, but it will last you forever if take care of it.
1. You can either side-discharge, mulch, or bag. It literally only takes seconds to change from mulch to bag.
2. With the ninja mulching blade, this mower will make easy work out of high or even damp grass.
3. With the hi-vac blade and bagger, this mower will literally suck up anything and won't clog with wet grass or leaves.
4. It has an infinitely-variable drive system up to about 3.5 mph, which means you can either walk slow or power-walk behind it.
5. It takes less than a minute to change the deck height.
6. The oil filter and oil drain plug are easily accessible
7. The mower is built to put up with commercial abuse, which I've given it for two years. Take care of it and it will take care of you.

If you want a crappy lawn tractor to cut your grass, then buy an MTD and you'll get that. If you want a good machine for a good price, buy a Snapper Commercial 21" Hi-Vac.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks im looking for something wider than 21" though thats why i was going to get a crap cadet...dont want to spend more than 2k...was looking at red hawk's as well for 1800 you get a 3' deck but i hear they are crap and built in china
 
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Try looking at a lesco WB. I have one for sale here. Built very good and would be perfect for your property. You could get your lawn finished and go make an extra $30 at the neighbors before that 21" could finish your yard. WB's are much more efficient than a riding mower plus keeps you fit.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=300524
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have an old Murray probably around 10 years old at my parents I was thinking of getting a new battery and changing oil spark plugs and belts....I wanted the red hawk walk behind, isnt it the center blade that makes the grass have those nice lines?
 

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I have an old Murray probably around 10 years old at my parents I was thinking of getting a new battery and changing oil spark plugs and belts....I wanted the red hawk walk behind, isnt it the center blade that makes the grass have those nice lines?
No, the lines, or "stripes" as they're commonly referred to are a result of the sunlight reflecting off blades of bent-over grass. As you run a mower wtih the blades on, the grass is pushed forward by the lift of the blades, or by the striking bar on the back of the mower. The blades' lift causes the grass to reach out toward the blades, thus producing a crisp cut and noticeable lines. The blade in the center has little or nothing to do with the overall defination of the stripes other than it needs to be as balanced and as sharp as the other blades.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No, the lines, or "stripes" as they're commonly referred to are a result of the sunlight reflecting off blades of bent-over grass. As you run a mower wtih the blades on, the grass is pushed forward by the lift of the blades, or by the striking bar on the back of the mower. The blades' lift causes the grass to reach out toward the blades, thus producing a crisp cut and noticeable lines. The blade in the center has little or nothing to do with the overall defination of the stripes other than it needs to be as balanced and as sharp as the other blades.
I thought the center blade went in opposite direction or something...thanks for clarifying
 
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