Water Sense Program

Who here is involved in the Water Sense Program advocated by the IA and EPA?
I ask as I did a bit of research and there seems to be no testing sites here in Texas and simply wondered as to the efficacy of this program and it's relative merits?
 

bcg

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Tx
Closest IA tests I've seen are Tulsa, OK and Arkansas. I thought about taking my CLIA test for the same reason, to get the Water Sense certification, but like you, I'm not sure it's worth the money. The test isn't cheap to begin with and when you add travel, hotel and not working costs, it gets pretty expensive, pretty fast. I'm thinking that since I don't see any other Water Sense partners amongst my competition, it probably isn't worth the hassle/expense but maybe someone will say otherwise.
 
Ya know I think your time spent studying TX issues is far better spent. I'm discovering what a world apart TX is from the USA in irrigation. I've got IA teaching credentials but I'm going to reform them to TX issues and forget the rest of the USA. I'm not saying its good or bad just that TX has their State of Mind and the IA doesn't mean squat. Showing fancy IA logos in TX isn't going to get you far. Maybe on LEEDS stuff and some new fangled commercial it might. Just my 2 cents I could be very wrong. I think if I was studying the best education sources for credentials I'd focus on the TAMU irrigation program. I personally would not have trouble shooting bullet holes in a TX irrigator bragging about his or her IA credentials. Anybody pushing for IA authority over TX TCEQ authority is a nut job in my book.
 
OP
txgrassguy

txgrassguy

LawnSite Gold Member
It was just a thought - and like a fart sailing away on the wind - it's gone just as fast.
Never could figure out the "appeal" of some of these programs when the industry itself is so fragmented - and I wondered why the WaterSense program wasn't more easily available to Texas Irrigator's?
 

bcg

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Tx
I talked to an EPA Water Sense rep at the IA show that was in my LIA class. She said that the Tx LI and Auditor certification were nto accepted because they didn't focus enough on conservation at the time the EPA reviewed their requirements. I suggested they might want to review the laws here since things have changed so much in the last couple of years and gave her som examples of the new requirements (drip in parkways, pressure regulation required, etc.). She was surprised to hear how much more stringent the requirements were for us as opposed to the rest of the nation and said she'd definitely bring it up when she got back to Washington but, I doubt anything will ever come of it. I guess my point is that EPA has chosen IA because they're national and like most government agencies, EPA isn't really setup to look for rule exceptions that make sense. They figure we can get IA certification if we want to participate and if we don't, then we don't.

After spending a lot of time talking with her though, I really didn't see what value it added unless you were in an area where most of your competitors had it so not doing so set you apart in a negative way. Like Peter says, IA certs really don't seem to amount for much in Tx. Even the outgoing chair of the TCEQ Irrigation Advisory council isn't IA certified, I don't believe. That should tell you how much value it has here.
 

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