Weed ID

1337david

LawnSite Member
Seems to be a perennial because of the buildup underneath it, but could be an annual in southern climates where it can overwinter without total death.

Leaf blade is too thick to be dallisgrass, but still has a similar spikelet. Looking closer it seems to be alternating single seeds while dallisgrass and paspalum mandiocanum (broadleaf dallisgrass) have seeds in rows of 4.

So at this point I would look at the lower nodes of the runners to see if they are rooting. If they are rooting it is probably Broadleaf Signalgrass (an annual). If they aren't rooting and you dig it up to see a stubby (less than 1-2 inch long) rhizomes that resemble beehives then I would guess bull paspalum (a perennial).
dallisgrass.png
Broadleaf Signalgrass.png
 
OP
L

LawnDays

LawnSite Member
Location
McDonough, GA
Thanks for the replies. I went by my product supplier and they think it could be Alexander grass or signal grass. Not certain though.

It has not responded to Quinclorac while crabgrass did.
 

Smokindog

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
DFW area
Thanks for the replies. I went by my product supplier and they think it could be Alexander grass or signal grass. Not certain though.

It has not responded to Quinclorac while crabgrass did.
Signalgrass is listed for Quinclorac.

That said, more mature plants do not always respond to Quin either.

I use DriveXLR8 and this footnote applies to both crab and Signal grass

upload_2019-10-1_18-27-47.png
 

1337david

LawnSite Member
It's 100% not crabgrass, which is why I didn't mention it earlier. The seeds on the spikelets are way to broad to be crabgrass. The fatties like those point towards paspalums or signalgrass usually. Look at a crabgrass seed on a spikelet very closely, you will notice it is torpedo shaped, long and narrow.
 

Top