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It was in the upper 90’s last week with head indexes around 103-105, we stopped at 2 pm. I think most companies did the same thing. No need in killing your guys
 

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It was in the upper 90’s last week with head indexes around 103-105, we stopped at 2 pm. I think most companies did the same thing. No need in killing your guys
Bunch'a pansies.
I'm 54 and it didn't kill ME.

(because I sat in the AC for a LONG time between jobs! LOL!)

It can be brutal. We had 2 days this past week in mid 90s (maybe higher - I was afraid to look) with nasty-high humidity, and sweat was just dripping off my nose as I walked. I have no idea how you guys in the south do this.
Thankfully, it dropped to the 80s on Friday and then it dropped like a rock to 51 degrees this morning, with a high of 71 degrees! Perfect!
 

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It was brutal here in central Illinois last week too. We only mow a couple days a week and do hardscape projects the rest of the time. My 3 sons are my crew. I’m in my forties, they are teens. We are in the middle of rebuilding a collapsing retaining wall over 100’ long. We mowed on Monday, then worked the wall job Tue-Thurs. temps up to 98/99 and I have no idea what the heat index was, but humidity was likely 80% or more. Just drenched in sweat. We waited until late morning to start because the wall area is partially shaded in the afternoon. We worked until 6 or 7 every night. We all did fine. We set a pace that didn’t kill us, took plenty of breaks, drank gallons of water and Gatorade. I grew up farming. Used to put up hay and straw in this weather. I’ve never really done anything but work either outside, or in non air conditioned shops, so I take it as just part of work. Yes, it wears me out. But we don’t call off work. We just adjust the pace to fit the working conditions, just like we do in the winter when it’s zero out. We might break for a few hours in the afternoon if necessary, but come back and work into the evening.

Here’s a couple of tips:

Don’t drink cold water. Cool is ok, but your body is using so much energy when your hot. It takes energy to warm that cold water up to your elevated body temp. It wears you out faster than drinking cool or even ambient temp water. You are drinking to replace the lost fluid, not to cool off.

Don’t go in and out of air conditioning. Extreme temperature fluctuations put you in a small state of shock. Very hard on you and zaps energy. When you move from job to job, run the A/C in the truck, but leave the windows down at least halfway. Cool is ok. Cold is not. You don’t want to completely cool, then heat up again. I refuse to eat lunch inside. We eat lunch under a shade tree. Better off to get your food and eat outside. Easier on your body.

Cool off under shade. If you are working a landscape or other long job, bring a fan. Cool off in front of it, not in air conditioned space.

Then at the end of the day, nothing beats a shower and relaxing in air conditioning! A cold adult beverage is nice too! Lol.
 

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Never have called off mowing due to heat. I just shift into low gear. I've had some indoor jobs that were in hot environments so my idea of too hot is skewed a bit. It will never be as hot outside as it is tending to food in a commercial convection oven set to 450 degrees. With that said, 100 degrees is about as hot as it ever gets in my area and that's very rare.
 

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We cover up, and wear loose, light clothing and wide brim hats. Drink before you’re thirsty, keep lots of cool water on hand and sip frequently. My wife was doing all those things and she still almost blacked out, had to sit down every now and then and rest. There are plenty of cordless fan options, Ryobi even has a cordless misting fan that secures to the top of a 5 gallon bucket.

Make sure your crew members know the symptoms of heat exhaustion so they can look out for themselves and others. Taking someone to the hospital is not productive or cheap.

We don’t have a temperature where we won’t work, but we are talking about working shorter days and spreading out the schedule. Working on bright white concrete next to pools in the full sun is brutal.
 

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Never have outright just stopped due to an oppressive Heat Index of 100+.

We will push our start-time ahead to the crack of dawn, in order to be done for the day by early/mid-afternoon.

In the meantime, just make sure that everyone has adequate water/sport drinks and a cooling towel.
 

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Each of my 3 sizes of mowers has a bottle of water on board so that I have something handy at all times.
When it's brutally hot, that water can get too hot to drink if it's in direct sun for a long time before you need it, but I know how to "rotate" it with stuff from the cooler before starting a job.
 

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I go by how the turf appears. When drought or excessive heat, I'll see stress appearing lower in the grass below that which I would eventually cut off. Due to our humidity here in the corn-belt, we are quite prone to brown patch fungus when nighttime temps sometimes stay in the low-mid 80s.

I monitor weather apps via Wunderground.com. These are local weather stations and I have several programmed into my phone to check the avg conditions where I'm working. When dew points surpass 80 is when I'm checking the heat indices between lawns. It's somewhat common to have the heat index exceeding 120 here...no lie. Once the heat index passes 115 or so, I'll call it a day. No use possibly hurting myself...even though I can tolerate it. Go to Dew Point maps to see where dew points are highest at any given time. The Midwest from Eastern KS stretching over into Indiana through Nebraska/Iowa/Missouri/Illinois can really max out due to the corn crop and how much moisture it requires and subsequently gives off.

Our AC went out last Thursday night. New unit to be installed Tue AM. This heatwave has taken on a new meaning as we're toughing it out! Fortunately the dew points are staying in the low-mid 70s for now. Tuesday's high of 99 would have been a test...hope we're cooling back down by then w/ our new AC.
 
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