What in the world is going on

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by berrynick59, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. berrynick59

    berrynick59 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 15

    No clue what is taken place with my lawn right now. Three weeks ago I put down my winterizer from Scott’s and before that I put down dollar spot and brown patch treatment. After that we had a lot of rain in the Maryland area and guys cut my grass after that shortly after the cut we got more rain and now this is what I see. Not sure what to do or what is going on

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  2. jc1

    jc1 LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,421

    We are coming through one of the wettest and warmest months on record.
    Disease is running rampant. Fertilizing 3 weeks ago with "winterizer" is timed really too early. A high dose of nitrogen will help cause flush growth and increase disease activity.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    berrynick59

    berrynick59 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 15

    What product has high dose of nitrogen I can use as suggested
     
  4. jc1

    jc1 LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,421

    More then likely your winterizer that was applied 3 weeks ago has helped fuel fungus activity along with the wet weather. I was not talking about the use of it rather, commenting on your timing of using it. September is pretty early to be thinking winter fertilizer.
    You need to do some spot seeding or over seed the lawn as a whole.
     
  5. That Guy Gary

    That Guy Gary LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,413

    Hard to tell with the pics, some are blurry. There are some diseases that just destroy the leaf blades, crown and roots survive and recover.

    What fungus treatment did you use?

    You might be looking at white patch, or ascochyta leaf blight. If it's either of those diseases the grass will recover.

    Avoid nitrogen fertilizers when it's hot and wet because a lot of diseases do best when they have young, tender leaves to infect and the injury to the blades caused by mowing increases the chance the grass will become infected.
     
  6. wjjones

    wjjones LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 554

    Need to run a dethatcher through it so it can breathe, and dry out some.
     
  7. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 15,603

    My first thought was fertilizer burn. If it is in a straight line--its human caused--usually. Sow some seed to fix the spot. Top quality--disease resistant seed.
    If its disease, it should recover as the weather cools off.
    You should be mowing it a little shorter.
     

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