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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i was planning on giving my two weeks notice in mid february and leaving in early march.i was figuring this would give me a few weeks to get my equipment and advertising in order before spring cleanup begins.any thoughts?
 

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I dont think that is a good idea?

1) Grass doesn't grow year around. Well in Iowa it doesn't.

2) go full time when you cant handle both jobs at once.

I would seriously wait until you fill your schedule up with work until you quit your job. I would even save a few months rent ahead of time just in case the Lawn Business doesn't work out for you.

P&P Lawncare*Landscape
 

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I would first get a good customer base first. Start getting the customer base at the end of this year like in November and December.
 

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how many customers do you have now? if your making as much mowing as you are at your full time job I say quit and really push for more lawns you could be doubling your income by the end of spring. Remember your not going to make the big bucks working for someone else. your just filling his pockets with the green stuff not yours JMHO
 

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cntryboy,
There is one thing I haven't seen mentioned yet, and that is health insurance. I know you must have health insurance provided to you by the Ford garage. When you are on your own, you are the one that is going to be responsible for it. I am sure you know how costly it can be. It would probably be in the neighborhood of $300-$400 per month for single guys like you and me. Add that in with your business liability insurance and other business costs and that is quite a bit of money to pay out per month. It's up to you how you start out and I wish you the best, but I agree with what the guys here say. Make sure that you build up a good, solid customer base before quitting your job at the garage. Also be thinking of ways to suplement your income during the offseason. Upstate NY can sure have long winters. I can speak from experience being from that area. Best of luck.
 

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Originally posted by HarryD
how many customers do you have now? if your making as much mowing as you are at your full time job I say quit and really push for more lawns you could be doubling your income by the end of spring. Remember your not going to make the big bucks working for someone else. your just filling his pockets with the green stuff not yours JMHO
Ditto

I quit my fulltime job working for the man in April. So far everything has gone the way I planned it. I had been in this business for 5 years part-time. I say make the switch while you're young.
 

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Cntryboymc, you have to sit down and see what your current income is without your fulltime job figured in. If you can afford it, and if you can pickup enough new customers in the spring to cover you, go for it and don't look back. I thought of leaving my fulltime job in May, but then I found out my wife was pregnant. I carry the insurance, so guess who stayed put at a crummy job. I have since started paying for insurance through my wifes work, so I have 2 insurances and I now have the option of leaving my job.
I would suggest as some of the others did and try and do both for as long as possible before up and quitting a regular pay check. I work my regular 40hrs and mow about 30hrs a week, sometimes with help. Momma has told me to make a decision next year, cause she ain't gonna sit around waiting for me every night. Take it from a guy who has thought it out for awhile.
You might want to think about snowplowing, blowing or cutting some firewood for some off season $. That is what I do. Good luck to you, whatever your decision is.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
guys thanks for all the info!i want to go out on my own while im able to do so.right now i live at home,dont pay rent(rent is mowing/plowing),not married,no kids,no major debts.im not real happy with the ford dealer i work at.i basically worked 15 hrs this weekend mowing and trimming bushes and made more than my take home pay at ford for 42 hrs a week.i do plow snow,cut firewood,do mechanical work,and odd jobs in the winter already.all of my equipment is paid for right now.i see these as all major bonuses to me.also im currently turning work away,which i hate doing.
 

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I will play Devil's advocate,

A hungry man always finds food. If you have the desire to succeed and the courage to make it happen I would go for it. You don't have anything to loose.

All you need is enough cash to keep your equipment healthy and gas for the truck. When I have 35hrs of work for the week I stretch it to 60...so I am out there meeting neighbors and getting exposure. If you have a spare hour go knock on doors, IMO flyer's are a waste of time.

Don't be afraid to take chances when there is nothing to loose.
 

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if you live home with your parents, do it. its a no brainer. in fact, i would start tommorow saving every penny i can, and quit the job in february.
 

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I am planning on quitting my full time job in March 2004 and going full time too. I am planning on expanding my business to mostly commercial accounts next year. I will start to mail out fliers to 100-200 commercial properties in my area in October with discounts for siging up early. I will mail out one flier a month through february and then I will start going door-to-door to those that I have not heard back from yet. I am planning in aquiring 60 accounts before I give my 2 week notice. I will also be hiring one employee and purchasing an eXmark Lazer hp. Hopefully by the mid to late season I will be able to trade in my truck to a 2004 Dodge Rm 2500HD Hemi so I can plow in the following winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
ok guys,im gonna stick it out until march.i want to keep my customers that i have now,finish out the season,and start fresh then.for the fall besides cleanups,ive got firewood to cut for next year,a demolition job on a house,night school for landscape design,and im considering a new plow for my truck.either an 8ft curtis or western-any thoughts?im currently getting quotes of $1,000 for million dollar liability coverage for plowing/landscape work.health insurance quote of $2,400 per year.any thoughts?should i talk with my accountant about collecting sales tax,with holding federal and state taxes?im really pumped up about making this move.ive been working at this for quite a while and it really seems to be coming together this year with adding new equipment and having important customers with many high profile contacts.also should i try to get more or different equipment before i start.im in the process of buying another stihl string trimmer and jd 21"walk behind mower.ive also got a very good offer to trade my trailer up to 16' so i can carry two ztrs.thoughts?
 

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cntryboymc;are you willing to make the sacrifice?that is a question only you can answer.Stay up late to do your billings.Make a sales call when it is convenient for your customer?work long hours to make ends meet.This job is mostly about passion.Do you have the passion to take this job to the level where you can live and make a profit.If you have the guts than go for it.The work will come if you seek it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
ive got the passion to make my business work full time.i just want to make sure ive got all my bases covered to take care of my customers andtake care of myself so i dont have financial problems.
 

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Glad to hear you have the passion;now you need the support.Get a good accountant,insurance agent,lawyer, and see if there is a SCORE program in your area.These are successful business men and women in your area that set up a network to help new business.Look into the small business association( they have a website) and check that out.Next set up your home team(family) to help you get started and for support.What I mean by that is if your companion doesn't't have the desire to help you realize that from the start and make appropriate arrangements for people who will help you.Don't let family work for you unless this goes for their common good as well;don't let them look at you as the loan and trust company.They'll sap more money from you than any employee.Watch this site a lot you have a wealth of info here at your fingertips that puts you at least 5 years ahead of the trial and error method.
 
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