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:blob3: just curiuos if this has happened to anybody else? i do lawn main., chems, and snow for a coustomer pull up to mow today and the house was freshly cleaned up w/ new mulch, probably about a $1000 job, not even a phone call, unbelievable, i think my snow list just become one less.

i lost 2 jobs this year due to the poor weather and very impatient people, both new customers who think they are the only ones and all should be dropped fro them, i got from both "dont you guys work in the rain".


oh well sorry for the rant, seems like people have less loyalty as the years go on, i quess doing their home for 8 years and seeing all the nice work we have done in the neighborhood amount to nothing. tony
 

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I hear you. Just today, a customer of mine who I have been cutting for about 9 years dropped me mid season. This is at least the 4th time she has dropped me in 5 yrs. She is always on the lookout for the absolute cheapest cut she can get.
The last guy showed up with a 7hp 28" riding mowing (that he drove 2 kilometers to get to the job) and was only charging $10 canadian dollars per hour. ($7 american) What a deal!
For a lawn that takes me just over 2 hrs to cut, he managed to drag it out for 10 hrs and he still didn't get all the trimming done. He lasted 3 weeks before he quit the mowing business.

Every year she has asked me to come back and I am only too happy to resume cutting, with a "small" price increase of course.

Keep your chin up. Let them know that next time you would like to give them a quote.
Have a great day.
 

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Seems that people want everything handed to them and since they are ntot eh ones doing it they dont realize how hard they actually are.


Do our CUSTOMERS work in the rain.......then why should we?:rolleyes:
 

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:blob3: being from the area im in, i dont think many of my customers will walk to the mailbox in the rain.:blob2:
 

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We work in the rain. Been working in the rain as long as I can remember.

I don't know about any of you. I only have a 9 month season. Schedule has to be kept.

It is so much easier to stay on schedule or be a little ahead, than try to make up for lost time. And this year would have been a disaster with all the rain we had.

OK, not all aspects of our work can be done in the rain, but much of it can
 

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Those are the kind of accounts that you don't want or need. The next time they call you for a service tell them that your business has moved upscale and that you only service high end accounts (meaning your fees have gone up). I do that with all the accounts that want everything "right now". I give it to them right now...but they pay for it.
 

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Glan hit the nail on the head:) If we did not work in the rain we would not be in business. We have worked every week day so far this year except for two days where it poured all day.
 

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Originally posted by Heller Landscaping
Glan hit the nail on the head:) If we did not work in the rain we would not be in business. We have worked every week day so far this year except for two days where it poured all day.
I absolutely refuse to work in the rain. I don't care how far behind. I don't mean a few sprinkles, I mean rainy days. We've had a bunch of those this year. My experience when trying to cut in the rain has always been so miserable and pointless that I don't see the purpose. Cleanup alone of all the clumped up grass turns the job into a much bigger PITA than it needs to be, nothing is gained.

Back to the original point. I try not to sweat people who can't wait for me. I've got a woman that has had her neighbor mow her lawn every week this month a day before I'm scheduled to be there just because she can't wait for me to show on my day. She keeps calling to tell me not to come because she's already had it done. The joke's on her, because she's no longer a customer and will find out with her statement this month!

My theory is that it's a good thing to have a small turnover rate each year, taking on new customers to replace them. After a while, certain people get "stale" and it's a good thing to rotate them out for fresh blood.
 

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Originally posted by General Grounds
very impatient people, both new customers who think they are the only ones and all should be dropped fro them,
It's so true. It astounds me how so many normally intelligent normal in every other way people think they are the only ones, period. Asking for special treatment that presents more of an obstacle in scheduling is done by them with no regard the problems it creates.

As for mowing in the rain, it all depends;
How much rain.
How hard or soft the ground is.
Is property slopped.
Has property now become a wet weather creek.
Is lightning striking very close.
 

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This problem is not just hitting the lawn care industry but all areas of America. People want to feel like they are your only customers, get the cheapest price possible and get the work done immediately. What I am saying is that it is a sign of the times. By the same token don't just blow all of this off and blame it on the customer but see if there was anything you could have done to keep them.


Gravely_Man
 

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"My theory is that it's a good thing to have a small turnover rate each year, taking on new customers to replace them. After a while, certain people get "stale" and it's a good thing to rotate them out for fresh blood."



I can't stand turn over. Every new customer we acquire is done so with the idea of a LONG term relationship.

Work get easier for the property the more years you put in, up to a point where your running on auto pilot.

Replacing a lost customer is at minimum 30% more costly.

Why replace, when it is better to add.

Our turn over is 2%.

Your in the business for the long run, why not your customers?
 

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Whoa................Morality!!!


Now that is an explosive topic. Not sure you all want me to get started on that one?............;)
 

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GLAN I agree with you on the cost of adding a customer. Customers are like employees, you have to train them so that everything runs smoothly. They need to get used to you and you to them.

Ran: I will work in the rain, but I keep a record of what properties should not be done in the rain. Such as yards that flood easily. And I work the schedule so that I do the others and move the ones that can't be done in the rain out a day or two.
 

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Originally posted by GLAN
Whoa................Morality!!!

Now that is an explosive topic. Not sure you all want me to get started on that one?............;)
What i am saying is Without Morality you wont have loyalty
 

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Originally posted by GLAN
"My theory is that it's a good thing to have a small turnover rate each year, taking on new customers to replace them. After a while, certain people get "stale" and it's a good thing to rotate them out for fresh blood."

I can't stand turn over. Every new customer we acquire is done so with the idea of a LONG term relationship.

Work get easier for the property the more years you put in, up to a point where your running on auto pilot.

Replacing a lost customer is at minimum 30% more costly.

Why replace, when it is better to add.

Our turn over is 2%.

Your in the business for the long run, why not your customers?
The cost of new customers may be greater than keeping the ones you have, but I believe a business should always be looking to create the perfect customer base. 30% may be a bargain if the customer you are replacing is a customer service nightmare. The kind that has you pulling out their contract and proposal every other week to prove to them that this and that are not included. The fact is, some customers are not right for me. Un-profitable, difficult accounts need to be replaced with profitable ones.

Also, you can usually tell which customers are going to be your loyal lifers and which ones will be intent on making you miserable as long as you are the lowest bidder.

TurfTamer

always tell the truth . . . It's easier to remember.
 

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Originally posted by GLAN
"My theory is that it's a good thing to have a small turnover rate each year, taking on new customers to replace them. After a while, certain people get "stale" and it's a good thing to rotate them out for fresh blood."

I can't stand turn over. Every new customer we acquire is done so with the idea of a LONG term relationship.

Work get easier for the property the more years you put in, up to a point where your running on auto pilot.

Replacing a lost customer is at minimum 30% more costly.

Why replace, when it is better to add.

Our turn over is 2%.

Your in the business for the long run, why not your customers?
The cost of new customers may be greater than keeping the ones you have, but I believe a business should always be looking to create the perfect customer base. 30% may be a bargain if the customer you are replacing is a customer service nightmare. The kind that has you pulling out their contract and proposal every other week to prove to them that this and that are not included. The fact is, some customers are not right for me. Un-profitable, difficult accounts need to be replaced with profitable ones.

Also, you can usually tell which customers are going to be your loyal lifers and which ones will be intent on making you miserable as long as you are the lowest bidder.

TurfTamer

always tell the truth . . . It's easier to remember.
 

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Just a question.Noone mentioned anything about communicating with your clients.Do you forewarn them of delays? I try to make an effort to tell clients on X day if we're going to be late etc.I think this is one of the most overlooked elements of our business.Most times when talking with new prospects their biggest gripe about the former LCO was the fact they never knew when they were going to show up.I think people would be more understanding if you called and told them what is going on.How ticked do you get at repairmen who don't show up on time?
 
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