• Thankful For Your Family…. Business?
    Landscaping businesses are often family endeavors. While this can combine the best of both worlds (personal and professional), it isn’t always smooth sailing. Click here to read more.

Where to fill your tank in the field

DeepGreenLawn

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Woodstock, GA
I was wondering where you filled your tanks in the field. I have trucks that service areas a good 30 minutes plus away from the shop and need to know some ideas that will allow them to refill without having to come all the way back home again.

Thanks,
Adam
 

MarcSmith

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Washington DC
depending on the township, and local regs, you may be able to by a fire hydrant permit with a meter so you can fill at a fire hydrant and then report you watre usage for billing purposes

doing install work and having a hydrant near by was always nice to water in sod, wash down parking lots, ect...with major water and not be stuck using a garden hose... it wasn't cheap the permit was like 1000 bucks which included the meter, but if you turned the meter back in you got most of it back...so i guess it was more of deposit...the issue is that you need ot make sure that yu only have "area" to deal with. up here Ihad 3 localities that I had deal with and you had to know the proper hydrants for the proper meter. get it wrong... and get caught big fine...
 

grassman177

LawnSite Fanatic
i dont think you are allowed to do big fills and mixes int eh field or on private or public land, better check you laws b4 this. we go badk tothe shop, no biggie, but there is the issue of how much are you going out with the first time> and are you talking a skid tank, or a ride on, or both?
 

phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
I used to do the hydrant permit thing. What ever money was spent on the permit saved much more in lost production time.

You might also check with Municipal Utilities to see if you can use grey water.

It used to be legal to pump from streams & ponds if you had an approved anti-back flow device, but I thing those days are long gone. Besides when we used to do that, we always had calls that our trucks were spotted dumping pesticides into the water.
 
OP
D

DeepGreenLawn

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Woodstock, GA
I am using a 200 gal. I usually run a little short. I believe my next one will be 300. If I am remembering correctly another 100 gal would definitely let me finish a full day.

I do have one nursery who has a pond that I use at my furthest location but there are still some far away areas that I would really like to find a location that I can refill at. Losing an hour just in drive time, not to add the time it takes to refill along with the cost of fuel is a lot more than I care to do. Right now I am trying to get work done from the furthest point and work my way back, hoping I will be closer to home if I need to make a run back to refill.
 

MarcSmith

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Washington DC
I would call the FD or the water department. you need a hydrant permit. for filling water tanks. I'm sure the folks who fill swimming pools use the fire hydrants...
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Add an extra tank. For example and extra 300 gals. Only partially full. Drop by a gas station--tip the guy 20 bucks. Or do his grass for free. (maybe at his house. ) Keep asking, you will find someone who wants free lawn care. Then you can go there all the time. Just be courteous and safe. Never let the hose touch the fluid in the tank. Never allow any chance of backflow or back-siphoning. I am sure that is the law in Georgia. Some states require an air-break device. Do your weed killer mixing somewhere else--like on site. Be sure you have proof of the cost of water per 1000 gallons. In most cities it is about a dollar a thousand.
 
Top