Who was self taught?

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by Green-Man, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. Green-Man

    Green-Man LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,100

    I'm learning little by little on my own towards the field of Turf and ornamental by reading online here. I really love turf health. He is South Florida we mainly deal with St. Augustine and the higher end homes my have empire Zoysia. Where did you guys learn the material on your own? Seems like there are endless fertilizer combinations, with micro nutrient and then unlimited way to use liquid and I just want to learn.
     
  2. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Messages: 1,431

    I took a license prep course before taking the Connecticut license test. Ours is extremely hard, 75% failure rate. The rest I learned from experience, a couple of books, and going to seminars and actually paying attention.
     
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  3. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 9,314

    I was. No one does this in Hawaii on residential turfgrass. I learned a lot talking to sod growers and golf people.
     
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  4. Green-Man

    Green-Man LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,100

    What books did you get? A prep course seems to be a great idea I will look into it myself. I always pay attention I love knowledge in this area of expertise.
     
  5. Green-Man

    Green-Man LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,100

    I will keep that in mind! My thing that is really getting to me is just all the different Chems and combinations of granular fertilizers and what is in the granular fertilizers you can use, then knowing what the turf and ornamentals need as a base and what they can be spoon fed with etc. A bit overwhelming if you ask me.
     
  6. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 9,314

    It is much simpler for me. The in vogue granular formulations do nothing for me on soils that are alkaline and full of salts. I get more out of an appropriate soluble formulation.
     
  7. PicturePerfectLawns

    PicturePerfectLawns LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,549

    I dealt with similar soils as the man above me - alkaline. I learned every bit of knowledge I have from the man above. I dealt with a lot of St. Augustine where Green Doctor doesn't, but it all boils down to the right nutrients, the right chemicals, the right timing. If you learn the basics of how the soil works, uptake of nutrients, and chemical names-labels-rates, and dig through all of Green Doctors post to me and others, you will learn all you need to know and then some more.

    I've posted pictures of my St. Augustine after started spraying, it never looked better. All learned from scratch with Green Doctor. His patience and knowledge is phenomenal and beyond your basic book knowledge. In fact, he teaches you from a more "real world" experience.

    I will add this to help you out, with St. Augustine if your chasing color density and a thick lush lawn, break down and study into insecticides and fungicides considering you cut St. Augustine. If you can stop the insects in summer and fungus in the fall and get the right levels of all your nutrients, including your pH, your property or propertie(s) will stand out from everything else.

    Just found these back in my photobucket. Note* this picture still had the old Green JDL gun on there. I can't remember what I was spraying at that time, but I eventually settled on Green Doctors method, with the hand-built boom on a pressure washer time gun with a regulator.

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  8. PicturePerfectLawns

    PicturePerfectLawns LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,549

    Green Doc, that's the lawn that used to be nothing but dirt and a little bit of clover, went to Zoysia, then St. Augustine. That lawn got so thick that it would shut a small horsepower push mower down dead in its tracks in some areas.
     
  9. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 9,314

    Tell me that is what happens when my Zoysia program is applied to St Augustine. I do not dare feed St Augustine like that lest it get too thick to mow or trim. I normally deal with St Augustine in dark, confined spaces where only crazy people in Hawaii would insist on growing grass. No way could I get a diesel powered ZTR on my St Augustine lawns. I still pay attention to diseases and insects, but nutrient levels are kept low. Don't really need to push on St Augustine to grow here. Of course, the other part of St Augustine culture is no scalping whether by mowing or trimming. The importance of cultural practices is what caused me to take over the mowing of my accounts. A good chemical program means nothing if the turf is scalped or conversely rough cut at a high height when it should be kept at less than an inch.
     
  10. Doug Green

    Doug Green LawnSite Member
    Messages: 27

    We are just now starting to gather information regarding fertilization and herbicide applications. I'm trying to see if it's even possible for a small business to be able to get work and stay competitive with the bigger companies like TruGreen etc. Generally how expensive are the fertilizer and herbicides? How expensive is the equipment? How much on average do you get per house per application? Thanks in advance for any reply!!

    Doug Green
    4 Seasons Landscaping Services LLC
    www.landscaping4seasons.com
     

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