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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really would like to have a nice, professional looking lawn. I have a problem with my grass and need help. Could anyone tell me what the problem is and what would you do to fix it?

Thanks,

Ray

 

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Ok, On a more serious note. According to the Horticulture Gardener's Desk Reference you have a Magnesium or Copper deficiencie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Originally posted by leeslawncare
Well. tell us kirby? looks to me like a fungus or a insect prob? unless the dawgs are not out ?.what is the soil look like?is the ph right ?what is the climate?
Soil test 3 months ago:

  • pH 5.8
  • P 63
  • K 226
  • Ca 955
  • Mg 338
  • CAE 14.6

Weather has been 40 days without rain (until 2 days ago), soil looks good and dark.
 

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Was it possibly fed during august rainfall.
That wood would load it with nitrogen. Then
the drought and there the grass set with
a load of nitrogen and no moisture to process
and use it properly. just a possibility.
 

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Ray, Never mind your grass! Whats wrong with your spelling!?
:)
 

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ray...i assume this is bluegrass rite? I think the ph is all wrong. way too low. need to have it about .5 to 1 higher. That is probably tying up the other micros. The starter u applied may have affected the ph and now it needs buffering. that is all i can think of. my shot in dark of the internet. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ocutter, 4-5 days ago.

Morturf, Tall Fescue. Lime was applied at the time of soil test, pH should be good at this time.

Q: How long does starter fertilizer remain in the soil? How may pounds per 1000 N does 18-24-12 have?
 

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This all comes from the Ohio state turfgrass site.

TABLE 1. Acceptable Levels From Standard R.E.A.L. Soil Test
Test Parameter Acceptable Range

Ph 6.3 to 7.0
Lime Test Index 68 to 70

Phosphorus (P) lb/acre 50 to 75
Potassium (K) lb/acre 200 to 250
Calcium (Ca) lb/acre 800 to 16,000
Magnesium (Mg) lb/acre 150 to 2,000

Cation Exchange Capacity - Course Textures (sands) 1 to 5
Cation Exchange Capacity - Medium Textures (silts) 5 to 20
Cation Exchange Capacity - Fine Textures (clays) 20 to 30 plus

Base Saturations1:
Base Saturation, % Ca 40 to 80
Base Saturation, % Mg 10 to 40
Base Saturation, % K 1 to 5

1 assuming pH value is within recommended range.


Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC): CEC measures the capacity of the soil to hold exchangeable cations (nutrients). The cations include hydrogen, calcium, magnesium and potassium. The CEC depends largely on the amount and type of clay present and the organic matter content. The higher the CEC value, the more cations the soil is able to hold against leaching. It is not practical to attempt to increase the CEC of a soil by adding clay or organic matter on a large scale basis. Liming an acid soil will slightly increase the effective CEC.

Base Saturation: % Calcium, % Magnesium and % Potassium: Base Saturation is the extent to which the adsorption complex of a soil is saturated with exchangeable cations other than hydrogen or aluminum. It is expressed as a percentage of the total CEC.

Calcium to Magnesium Ratio: This ratio is calculated on the basis of percentage saturation of the soil CEC by each element. This ratio should be considered when lime is added to the soil. If the ratio is 1:1 or less (less Ca than Mg), a low magnesium limestone should be used. Turfgrasses grow over a wide range of ratios with the ideal ratio being about 6 to 10:1.

Magnesium to Potassium Ratio: This ratio should be greater than 2:1. In other words, the percent base saturation of Mg should be at least two times the percent base saturation of K. High K frequently results in reduced uptake of Mg by plants. Therefore, to help prevent plant nutrient imbalance, additional Mg may be required to maintain a Mg to K ratio of at least 2:1.



Soil pH and Lime Index: These are used to indicate whether your soil is acid, neutral, or alkaline. If the soil is acid you should read AY-21 "Liming Turfgrass". If it's too alkaline, refer to AY-18, " How to Interpret Your Lawn Soil Test Results" found in the section soil pH above 7.0. Very few lawn soils in Indiana will need lime. It is almost impossible to lower the pH of high alkaline soils (pH > 7.8) due to the large amount of free calcium in Indiana soils.

Nitrogen: No chemical test is made for available nitrogen; however, since grasses can utilize and respond to nitrogen fertilization, its continued and regular use is desirable for adequate turf growth. The need for nitrogen may be indicated by:

Light green grass with dark green clover.
Poor grass growth, even with adequate moisture present.
Green, rapidly-growing grass in spots among thin, light green grass.
Refer to AY-4 "Lawn Fertilization" for more information on nitrogen fertilization.
Phosphorus: On a new planting, adequate phosphorus should be mixed into the seedbed to encourage rapid plant growth (refer to recommendation E). However, after repeated use, phosphorus accumulates in established lawns, and further additions of phosphorus will be of limited value.

Potassium: Turf needs for potassium are much greater than they are for phosphorus. On irrigated lawns applications twice a year are considered wise. Consider twice a year use of Rec. C along with Rec. D as needed for areas low in potassium.

Calcium and Magnesium: These will rarely be a limiting factor. A recommendation of dolomitic limestone will be made if the soil test results are low.

Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC): This is used by the laboratory to help make the recommendation. This can not be changed in an established lawn. A low number (<8) indicates that the soil's cation exchange capacity is low, therefore fertilization must be more frequent.

Organic Matter Percent: This is not applicable to a lawn soil test. It is recommended that you test your soil every 3 to 5 years by sampling it to a 3 inch depth. Take 10 to 15 cores per lawn and combine to make one composite sample. Soil test bags and price schedules are available from the Purdue University Extension Office in your county. That office can supply you with the above mentioned AY publications and additional advice and help for your landscape and lawn needs.

Soil Testing Frequency: For home lawns and athletic fields a soil test from the Purdue University Soil Test Lab is recommended every 3 to 5 years.

Liquid vs. Dry Fertilizer: Color and growth rate does not change if a fertilizer is applied as a liquid or dry. It depends more on the actual components.

The above analysis represent samplings that are on the market. There is no intent by the author or Purdue University to indicate that products not mentioned are unacceptable. The above should be used as a guide in selecting a product.

My iterpetation stands....get another soil test now and see what the ph and P stands at. I have always wondered about adding starter fert (High phosphoric ACID) to an already acidic soil. This would negate some of the lime. Where I am located we are blessed with sweet and balanced soils.


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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The answer lies in your BIG post, good info. These are some of the worst blades, most look good and green. Still looking for suggestions for the problem and treatment.
 
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